NewsFeeds 6.23.09

How Crutchfield Corp. survived the recession (Daily Progress)
Crutchfield Corp. found its way through another recession, deeply cutting costs and trimming employee pay but avoiding layoffs. The Albemarle County company, now in its 35th year, also squeezed out a profit, and CEO Bill Crutchfield is optimistic, as sales have begun to grow again.

Area Firms Tweak Benefit Plans (Washington Post)
More Washington- and Baltimore-area employers are shifting health-insurance costs to workers, offering high-deductible health plans and imposing restrictions on prescription-drug coverage to save money in the recession, according to a new survey by area human resources managers to be released today.

Email patterns can predict impending doom (NewScientist)
Email logs can provide advance warning of an organisation reaching crisis point. That’s the tantalising suggestion to emerge from the pattern of messages exchanged by Enron employees.

Apple’s Secrecy on Products and Top Executives (NY Times)
Few companies, indeed, are more secretive than Apple, or as punitive to those who dare violate the company’s rules on keeping tight control over information. Employees have been fired for leaking news tidbits to outsiders, and the company has been known to spread disinformation about product plans to its own workers.

In bad economy, CEOs don’t want to be seen playing golf (USA Today)
Perhaps nothing is more symbolic of the CEO lifestyle than golf. A 2006 USA TODAY analysis of 115 golfing CEOs of large companies found 25 belonging to three or more country clubs at the same time. But an unscientific survey for USA TODAY of 163 CEO golfers by the CEO organization Vistage International this month found that 29% had reduced their rounds and another 11% have stopped playing altogether.

TV show helps Utah boy survive night solo in woods (AP)
Not business news, but pretty neat: When he realized he’d been separated from his family on a weekend hike in a northern Utah forest, 9-year-old Grayson Wynne’s thoughts turned to television.

In Tough Times, Companies Coddle Their Regulars (WSJ)
Some companies are allowing regulars to stagger payments or place smaller orders, and even throwing in free services to keep long-time customers interested. With fewer new clients coming in, small businesses hope that holding onto regulars will help maintain stability and possibly boost sales when the economy bounces back.

Can’t afford health care? Barter for it (Fortune)
In these cash-strapped times, bartering is gaining popularity – even for dental surgery and prescription drugs.

How Crutchfield Corp. survived the recession (Daily Progress)
Crutchfield Corp. found its way through another recession, deeply cutting costs and trimming employee pay but avoiding layoffs. The Albemarle County company, now in its 35th year, also squeezed out a profit, and CEO Bill Crutchfield is optimistic, as sales have begun to grow again.

Area Firms Tweak Benefit Plans (Washington Post)
More Washington- and Baltimore-area employers are shifting health-insurance costs to workers, offering high-deductible health plans and imposing restrictions on prescription-drug coverage to save money in the recession, according to a new survey by area human resources managers to be released today.

Email patterns can predict impending doom (NewScientist)
Email logs can provide advance warning of an organisation reaching crisis point. That’s the tantalising suggestion to emerge from the pattern of messages exchanged by Enron employees.

Apple’s Secrecy on Products and Top Executives (NY Times)
Few companies, indeed, are more secretive than Apple, or as punitive to those who dare violate the company’s rules on keeping tight control over information. Employees have been fired for leaking news tidbits to outsiders, and the company has been known to spread disinformation about product plans to its own workers.

In bad economy, CEOs don’t want to be seen playing golf (USA Today)
Perhaps nothing is more symbolic of the CEO lifestyle than golf. A 2006 USA TODAY analysis of 115 golfing CEOs of large companies found 25 belonging to three or more country clubs at the same time. But an unscientific survey for USA TODAY of 163 CEO golfers by the CEO organization Vistage International this month found that 29% had reduced their rounds and another 11% have stopped playing altogether.

TV show helps Utah boy survive night solo in woods (AP)
Not business news, but pretty neat: When he realized he’d been separated from his family on a weekend hike in a northern Utah forest, 9-year-old Grayson Wynne’s thoughts turned to television.

In Tough Times, Companies Coddle Their Regulars (WSJ)
Some companies are allowing regulars to stagger payments or place smaller orders, and even throwing in free services to keep long-time customers interested. With fewer new clients coming in, small businesses hope that holding onto regulars will help maintain stability and possibly boost sales when the economy bounces back.

Can’t afford health care? Barter for it (Fortune)
In these cash-strapped times, bartering is gaining popularity – even for dental surgery and prescription drugs.

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