And it's gone

After more than a year of waiting, Virginia Commonwealth University has finally demolished a 19th century building it owns at 734-736 W. Broad Street.

The VCU Real Estate Foundation bought the building in 2010 for $600,000 to make way for an expansion of the student apartmentat Broad and Belvidere. The building was built in 1889.

It was formerly occupied by the Common Groundz coffee shop.

After more than a year of waiting, Virginia Commonwealth University has finally demolished a 19th century building it owns at 734-736 W. Broad Street.

The VCU Real Estate Foundation bought the building in 2010 for $600,000 to make way for an expansion of the student apartmentat Broad and Belvidere. The building was built in 1889.

It was formerly occupied by the Common Groundz coffee shop.

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Brad
Brad
10 years ago

It’s a shame this historic urban building was demolished for a few more student dorms.

john M
john M
10 years ago

Brad
If VCU was not in downtown Richmond, it would be a ghost town
They have done more to improve the City then anyone

Brad
Brad
10 years ago

As an alumni and current grad student I know exactly how VCU has essentially saved Richmond, but to tear down several historic buildings on a slither of land when VCU controls over two acres across the street didn’t seem like the right path to take. I know that land is scheduled for development but it should be prioritized over property with existing structures. It’s also strange the Carver neighborhood didn’t put up much of a fight when they’ve raised hell over Gilbane building an appropriate development on an unused industrial site next to the Siegel Center.