High-end apartments slated for West Broad

Another eyesore along the West Broad Street corridor near Virginia Commonwealth University might soon get a little sprucing up.

Local general contractor and developer City & Guilds filed a special use permit for 1322 W. Broad St., near the intersection of Broad and Bowe, for a four-story apartment building with retail space on the first floor.

City & Guild owner David Gammino said the company will spend about $3.5 million on the project.

“The finished product is going to look similar to our other buildings,” Gammino said. “The apartments will be more on the high end.”

The 14,000-square-foot building will contain nine two-bedroom and 10 one-bedroom apartments, according to permits filed with the city.

Joseph P. Yates Architects is the architect for the project.

Gammino said he has heard from prospective commercial tenants for the first-floor retail space but did not elaborate.

The building dates to about 1910, according to the Historic Richmond Foundation, and is near the Siegel Center.

That area of Broad Street has seen an influx of development in recent years, including the Coliseum Lofts student housing and several other major renovations, mostly fueled by the growth of VCU.

Another eyesore along the West Broad Street corridor near Virginia Commonwealth University might soon get a little sprucing up.

Local general contractor and developer City & Guilds filed a special use permit for 1322 W. Broad St., near the intersection of Broad and Bowe, for a four-story apartment building with retail space on the first floor.

City & Guild owner David Gammino said the company will spend about $3.5 million on the project.

“The finished product is going to look similar to our other buildings,” Gammino said. “The apartments will be more on the high end.”

The 14,000-square-foot building will contain nine two-bedroom and 10 one-bedroom apartments, according to permits filed with the city.

Joseph P. Yates Architects is the architect for the project.

Gammino said he has heard from prospective commercial tenants for the first-floor retail space but did not elaborate.

The building dates to about 1910, according to the Historic Richmond Foundation, and is near the Siegel Center.

That area of Broad Street has seen an influx of development in recent years, including the Coliseum Lofts student housing and several other major renovations, mostly fueled by the growth of VCU.

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David Armentrout
David Armentrout
10 years ago

I like this mixed use idea and I think it’s time it came to my locality, Hanover County.
There is a perfect 16 acre site zoned R-5 on Lakeridge Pkwy (near Bass Pro Shop) that might just work for a small project.
Notify me if you know of anyone who would be interested. Hanover does have a MX zoning now.
I applaud City & Guild for their vision for Broad Street.

Joe
Joe
10 years ago

I think eyesore is a little too strong. Neglected would better describe the condition of this building. It should be beautiful when complete.
This building in its current condition is much better than what they build new in the counties.

Bruce Hobart
Bruce Hobart
10 years ago

Well, that calculates to $125,000/bedroom. Sign of the times I suppose. The project profits must be coming from the commercial space on the ground level. Interesting how low interest rates generate development. Long term viability will be determined by third/fourth generation lease turnovers vs. re-leasing expenses. I’m sure this will be an eye catching improvement to the emerging “new” Broad Street.