Architecture firm reaches for the eraser

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BAM Architects’ Scott’s Addition headquarters. (Photo by Mark Robinson)

A local architecture firm is closing its studio doors after 15 years in business.

BAM Architects will close June 30 as six of its eight employees will join Baskervill, another Richmond architecture firm, on July 1.

“We’ve been together for 15 years, and we’ve sort of developed different priorities in terms of how we work together in this profession,” said Burt Pinnock, BAM’s principal and co-founder, who will become a principal designer at Baskervill. “We want to pursue different things.”

Pinnock would not comment on which of the firm’s six employees were making the jump to Baskervill, nor would he say where the other two are headed. Pinnock’s co-founders at the firm are Anne Durkin and Mary Lorino.

BAM has worked with the city of Richmond over the years, designing projects such as the Virginia Civil Rights Memorial and Virginia Public Safety Memorial in Capitol Square, the U.S. National Slavery Museum and the Richmond Slave Trail.

The firm has also designed residential and retail projects in the area, including Canal Station apartments and Hodges Partnership building in Shockoe Bottom and the Hippodrome theater complex in Jackson Ward.

Its revenue totaled more than $750,000 each year, Pinnock said.

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Burt Pinnock was one of BAM’s three founders.

Pinnock graduated from Virginia Tech with a bachelor’s degree in architecture. He worked for Baskervill before co-founding BAM in 1998.

Baskervill has collaborated with BAM architects in the past on interior design projects for Capitol One.

Robert Clark, Baskervill’s president, said the municipal and civic experience the BAM team brings to Baskervill will benefit the company, which employs about 100 people.

“They further enhance our design talent. We add horsepower and geographic reach,” Clark said.

BAM leases studio space at 3310 W. Clay St., which is owned by L O A LLC. It will vacate the space at the end of June.

Pinnock said he hopes to do more adaptive reuse, or repurposing of old buildings, with Baskervill.

“Looking at who they are and who we are, there’s kind of a doughnut hole in terms of what they offer,” Pinnock said. “We can fill that doughnut hole.”

bam architects1edit

BAM Architects’ Scott’s Addition headquarters. (Photo by Mark Robinson)

A local architecture firm is closing its studio doors after 15 years in business.

BAM Architects will close June 30 as six of its eight employees will join Baskervill, another Richmond architecture firm, on July 1.

“We’ve been together for 15 years, and we’ve sort of developed different priorities in terms of how we work together in this profession,” said Burt Pinnock, BAM’s principal and co-founder, who will become a principal designer at Baskervill. “We want to pursue different things.”

Pinnock would not comment on which of the firm’s six employees were making the jump to Baskervill, nor would he say where the other two are headed. Pinnock’s co-founders at the firm are Anne Durkin and Mary Lorino.

BAM has worked with the city of Richmond over the years, designing projects such as the Virginia Civil Rights Memorial and Virginia Public Safety Memorial in Capitol Square, the U.S. National Slavery Museum and the Richmond Slave Trail.

The firm has also designed residential and retail projects in the area, including Canal Station apartments and Hodges Partnership building in Shockoe Bottom and the Hippodrome theater complex in Jackson Ward.

Its revenue totaled more than $750,000 each year, Pinnock said.

SONY DSC

Burt Pinnock was one of BAM’s three founders.

Pinnock graduated from Virginia Tech with a bachelor’s degree in architecture. He worked for Baskervill before co-founding BAM in 1998.

Baskervill has collaborated with BAM architects in the past on interior design projects for Capitol One.

Robert Clark, Baskervill’s president, said the municipal and civic experience the BAM team brings to Baskervill will benefit the company, which employs about 100 people.

“They further enhance our design talent. We add horsepower and geographic reach,” Clark said.

BAM leases studio space at 3310 W. Clay St., which is owned by L O A LLC. It will vacate the space at the end of June.

Pinnock said he hopes to do more adaptive reuse, or repurposing of old buildings, with Baskervill.

“Looking at who they are and who we are, there’s kind of a doughnut hole in terms of what they offer,” Pinnock said. “We can fill that doughnut hole.”

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Steve Gillispie
Steve Gillispie
9 years ago

BAM has done some wonderful work in Richmond. Hopefully, since so many of the designers remain in the game with Baskervill, the great talent there will not be lost.