Retailers’ vacation spot becomes second shop

Antiques store Class and Trash opened its second shop in North Carolina. Photos by Michael Thompson.

Glen Allen antiques store Class and Trash opened its second shop in North Carolina. Photos by Michael Thompson.

A local antiques store headed for the beach for its newest location.

Class and Trash, which first opened in Glen Allen in 2004, expanded earlier this year with a new store in Kill Devil Hills, N.C. on the Outer Banks.

Owners Ken and Lisa Waldrop opened the new store in May at 906 S. Croatan Highway. The couple signed a one-year lease on the 5,000-square-foot space.

“We felt there was just a tremendous need, and we vacation there quite a bit,” Ken Waldrop said. “We were worried it would be mostly tourist-driven, but the locals have been helping us out.”

Class and Trash buys and sells used furniture and home décor. The Waldrops find some of their inventory at auctions and estate sales.

Class and Trash first opened in 2004.

Class and Trash first opened in 2004.

They opened the first Class and Trash in 2004 at 11088 Washington Highway near Ashland after buying the existing Hanover Thrift that had operated there.

Waldrop said it cost $25,000 to open the North Carolina store and that it was financed by company money.

With two stores open, the Waldrops are looking to add more locations in Virginia.

“Maybe Virginia Beach and Newport News, possibly,” Waldrop said.

Class and Trash isn’t the only used goods store that’s expanding. Goodwill Industries of Central Virginia is working on opening a store near West Broad Village. It will be the nonprofit’s 16th store in the Richmond metro area.

Prior to getting in the antiques business, Lisa Waldrop worked in pharmaceutical sales at AmerisourceBergen, and Ken Waldrop said he worked various jobs. To test the waters of the thrift business, the Waldrops operated stands at antique malls in Midlothain and the West End.

Waldrop said he once sold an umbrella stand made from an elephant’s hoof for $250.

“We sell everything from really fine antiques to fixer-uppers,” Ken Waldrop said. “It’s almost always less than $500 for our stuff.”

Antiques store Class and Trash opened its second shop in North Carolina. Photos by Michael Thompson.

Glen Allen antiques store Class and Trash opened its second shop in North Carolina. Photos by Michael Thompson.

A local antiques store headed for the beach for its newest location.

Class and Trash, which first opened in Glen Allen in 2004, expanded earlier this year with a new store in Kill Devil Hills, N.C. on the Outer Banks.

Owners Ken and Lisa Waldrop opened the new store in May at 906 S. Croatan Highway. The couple signed a one-year lease on the 5,000-square-foot space.

“We felt there was just a tremendous need, and we vacation there quite a bit,” Ken Waldrop said. “We were worried it would be mostly tourist-driven, but the locals have been helping us out.”

Class and Trash buys and sells used furniture and home décor. The Waldrops find some of their inventory at auctions and estate sales.

Class and Trash first opened in 2004.

Class and Trash first opened in 2004.

They opened the first Class and Trash in 2004 at 11088 Washington Highway near Ashland after buying the existing Hanover Thrift that had operated there.

Waldrop said it cost $25,000 to open the North Carolina store and that it was financed by company money.

With two stores open, the Waldrops are looking to add more locations in Virginia.

“Maybe Virginia Beach and Newport News, possibly,” Waldrop said.

Class and Trash isn’t the only used goods store that’s expanding. Goodwill Industries of Central Virginia is working on opening a store near West Broad Village. It will be the nonprofit’s 16th store in the Richmond metro area.

Prior to getting in the antiques business, Lisa Waldrop worked in pharmaceutical sales at AmerisourceBergen, and Ken Waldrop said he worked various jobs. To test the waters of the thrift business, the Waldrops operated stands at antique malls in Midlothain and the West End.

Waldrop said he once sold an umbrella stand made from an elephant’s hoof for $250.

“We sell everything from really fine antiques to fixer-uppers,” Ken Waldrop said. “It’s almost always less than $500 for our stuff.”

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