The Valentine showcases $4 million upgrades

Visitors walk through The Valentine's newly renovated space and exhibit. Photos by Burl Rolett.

Visitors walk through The Valentine’s newly renovated space and exhibit. Photos by Burl Rolett.

A keeper of Richmond’s history has a new home to show off.

The Valentine Richmond History Center, now rebranded as The Valentine, reopens to the public this weekend after a $4.1 million renovation that began last November. Its main exhibit, entitled “This is Richmond, Virginia” is all but finished with more galleries and displays still to come.

The project was funded through a roughly $8.5 million private fundraising campaign. The first $4.1 million paid for the renovations and the rest will fund a museum endowment. The Valentine had raised about $5.3 million as of January, and spokesperson Domenick Casuccio said the museum is still pushing towards its $8.5 million goal.

Altria sponsors the “This is Richmond, Virginia” exhibit, which the museum showcased at preview events over the last week. The Valentine calls “This is Richmond, Virginia” it’s long-term display and plans to cycle new Richmond-centric displays through on a yearly basis.

A late 19th-century version of the Richmond seal, salvaged in 1989 from the Fulton city gas works.

A late 19th-century version of the Richmond city seal, salvaged in 1989 from the Fulton city gas works.

Current items include a clock from the former Miller & Rhoads department store and a display profiling six Richmond neighborhoods in transition, including Jackson Ward, Oregon Hill and Church Hill.

The Klaus and Reynolds Costume and Textile Galleries will open on the museum’s lower level in spring of next year and the rotating Stettinius Community Galleries will debut with an exhibit named “Made in Church Hill” in January.

The museum’s renovation was the biggest single piece of a $20 million plan to update The Valentine. Work has included a new roof, heating and air conditioning systems and a restoration of 19th-century sculptor Edward Valentine’s studio. Kjellstrom + Lee was the general contractor for the renovation and Glave and Holmes were the project’s architects.

Visitors walk through The Valentine's newly renovated space and exhibit. Photos by Burl Rolett.

Visitors walk through The Valentine’s newly renovated space and exhibit. Photos by Burl Rolett.

A keeper of Richmond’s history has a new home to show off.

The Valentine Richmond History Center, now rebranded as The Valentine, reopens to the public this weekend after a $4.1 million renovation that began last November. Its main exhibit, entitled “This is Richmond, Virginia” is all but finished with more galleries and displays still to come.

The project was funded through a roughly $8.5 million private fundraising campaign. The first $4.1 million paid for the renovations and the rest will fund a museum endowment. The Valentine had raised about $5.3 million as of January, and spokesperson Domenick Casuccio said the museum is still pushing towards its $8.5 million goal.

Altria sponsors the “This is Richmond, Virginia” exhibit, which the museum showcased at preview events over the last week. The Valentine calls “This is Richmond, Virginia” it’s long-term display and plans to cycle new Richmond-centric displays through on a yearly basis.

A late 19th-century version of the Richmond seal, salvaged in 1989 from the Fulton city gas works.

A late 19th-century version of the Richmond city seal, salvaged in 1989 from the Fulton city gas works.

Current items include a clock from the former Miller & Rhoads department store and a display profiling six Richmond neighborhoods in transition, including Jackson Ward, Oregon Hill and Church Hill.

The Klaus and Reynolds Costume and Textile Galleries will open on the museum’s lower level in spring of next year and the rotating Stettinius Community Galleries will debut with an exhibit named “Made in Church Hill” in January.

The museum’s renovation was the biggest single piece of a $20 million plan to update The Valentine. Work has included a new roof, heating and air conditioning systems and a restoration of 19th-century sculptor Edward Valentine’s studio. Kjellstrom + Lee was the general contractor for the renovation and Glave and Holmes were the project’s architects.

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