Westhampton on Grove wraps up as penthouse condos hit the market

The top-floor condos above Taste at Westhampton on Grove have hit the market. (Jonathan Spiers photo)

The high-end condo market continues to heat up in Richmond’s Libbie and Grove area, with more new units coming on the market and changing hands.

Two of three top-floor condos that make up the residential portion of the Westhampton on Grove mixed-use development have been completed and put up for sale in recent months, with price tags of $1.57 million and $2.25 million.

The condo above Mango Salon is under contract. (Jonathan Spiers photo)

The third unit, comparable in size and price to the bigger of the other two, is already under contract to an out-of-town buyer who put an offer on it before it could be listed.

The listings signal the completion of Westhampton on Grove, which has leased out all of its lower-level commercial spaces since construction on the building wrapped up.

With that part of the project finished, developers Stefan Cametas and Jason Guillot turned their attention to the residential portion — originally planned to be a dozen apartments.

“Jason and I were trying to get our commercial done first and then worry about the residential,” Cametas said. “It was going to be apartments, and we converted from 12 apartments to five penthouses to three penthouses. The reason we kept reducing the number of units is the demand for larger, single-floor living was pretty high.”

Both units include balcony patios with gas fireplaces. (Courtesy CVRMLS)

Featuring balcony patios with views of the neighborhood, the condos range from about 3,000 to 4,300 square feet in size, with three to four bedrooms and 3½ to 4½ bathrooms.

Cametas and Guillot listed the two remaining units with Pam Diemer of Long & Foster Real Estate, which houses its Grove sales office in the development.

Located above Taste restaurant, both condos – units 300 and 301 at 5706 Grove Ave. – include an homage to the former Westhampton Theater, which the development replaced and was modeled after. The units’ pantries feature reconditioned doors that were salvaged from the movie house before it was demolished.

Both units include front and rear balcony patios, totaling about 650 square feet and 1,500 square feet, respectively. The patios include a gas fireplace and built-in gas grill.

Diemer listed the units in late July. She said the units would appeal to buyers looking for maintenance-free living, which she said is in strong demand.

Mindy Carter Bain of M Carter Design handled the under-contract unit’s interior design, while local designer Bea Gates of Gates Interiors conceptualized the listed units’ designs for renderings created by Texas-based Hugo Render. Cametas said the under-contract unit, which is above Mango Salon, is set to close in early November.

The single-floor units are customizable. (Courtesy CVRMLS)

Meanwhile, the rest of Westhampton on Grove remains fully occupied, even with the challenges presented by the pandemic. In addition to Mango, Taste and Long & Foster, commercial tenants include Sisk & Marvel Investment Group, Montante Plastic Surgery & Aesthetics, Virginia Commonwealth Bank and Harbert Growth Partners.

“All the tenants are doing great. They’ve survived COVID fairly well,” Cametas said.

Westhampton on Grove’s penthouses join other high-end condos that have added to the neighborhood’s housing stock in recent years.

Around the corner on Libbie, one of two penthouses at The Tiber sold last month for $1.82 million. David Posner, who helped developer John George finish the condo project in 2017, listed the unitwith Page George, John’s wife, of Maison Real Estate Boutique. City property records list the buyer as Tiber Penthouse II LLC. The other penthouse there sold in 2018 for $1.62 million.

Other newer condos in the neighborhood include The Chadwick on Grove, while the nearby Maplewood infill project added four new homes, one of which remains for sale at $1.38 million. Also along Libbie, plans are in the works for 14 townhomes across the street from The Tiber.

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Bruce Milam
Bruce Milam
7 days ago

Adding to the value of these condos is a very unique construction process from local contractor Polycrete, involving pored concrete walls which began in the foundation and ran to the roofline. It was more expensive than the usual stick framing, but that building is a fortress! This development evolved over the years but it’s final rendition is a beautiful addition to that community. Jason Guillot is one of the area’s fine young developers.

Garry Whelan
Garry Whelan
7 days ago
Reply to  Bruce Milam

Whilst the building may be excessively robust, it is a shame that concrete and polystyrene are the main components in new buildings. Their claiming of ‘Eco-friendly’ properties is disingenuous at best.
We can do better in the 21st Century.

Garry Whelan
Garry Whelan
4 days ago
Reply to  Garry Whelan

It is delightful to see the developer community of RVA so firmly entrenched in carbon intensive construction techniques.
and people wonder why we end up with the cityscape we have.

David Humphrey
David Humphrey
4 days ago
Reply to  Garry Whelan

Instead of simply complaining and saying we can “do better”. It might be a better addition to the discussion to bring up sample materials or constructions techniques that you think are better. If you really want to add to the discussion perhaps a few examples of projects would help too.

Bruce Anderson
Bruce Anderson
4 days ago
Reply to  Garry Whelan

There’s a misunderstanding about concrete construction among some environmentalists. Because concrete includes cement, there’s an initial environmental impact as concrete is being made. Unlike other industries, we’re upfront about it and have been constantly working to reduce that impact through our industry’s partnership with MIT’s Concrete Sustainability Hub. Over time, concrete can actually absorb CO2, saving 3% to 5% in greenhouse gas emissions over the building’s lifetime. Did you know that ICF construction is a key component in the recent popularity of net zero energy K12 in the US? From a building energy efficiency standpoint, it’s hard to beat insulated… Read more »

Garry Whelan
Garry Whelan
4 days ago
Reply to  Bruce Anderson

Cement accounts for some 7% of global carbon emissions as the 2nd largest industrial source of carbon emissions.Cement production is increasing globally. The huge carbon footprint comes from the massive amount of energy required, and the huge quantities of CO2 driven off to make Calcium Oxide.
There is a place for concrete and ICF, but foundation-to-ceiling is not it. There are materials other than concrete or wood. Also, it’s easy to talk about building energy efficiency if you ignore the embodied energy.

Bruce Anderson
Bruce Anderson
4 days ago
Reply to  Garry Whelan

Garry, I appreciate your passion for sustainability. We’re on the same team. I recommend you look at the whole picture — life cycle analysis and alternative choices — new research and developments, including those from MIT. Did you know that the best performing mid-rise buildings in our major urban areas are ICF, and nearly all net zero energy schools in the US are also ICF? Making an unreachable and unaffordable perfect the enemy of excellent advances nothing. Keep up the good work!