Chesterfield plans rezoning of county-owned 1,850 acres near Moseley

The project area, which is north of Hull Street Road in western Chesterfield, consists of three parcels of land. (Courtesy of Chesterfield County)

Chesterfield County is setting the stage for at least one new school, a technology park, residential development and other uses on about 1,850 acres it acquired last year in the western part of the county.

The acreage consists of three parcels at 19801 Duval Road, 18100 Duval Road and 18950 Hull Street Road, located north of Hull Street Road in the so-called Upper Magnolia area near Moseley.

On Wednesday, the Board of Supervisors is scheduled to authorize county staff to create a rezoning and conditional use planned development application “to permit development of the properties which may include public facilities (i.e. schools), commercial, advanced manufacturing, research and development, office, and residential,” according to a staff report.

Beyond a new middle school and a technology park, the finer details such as the specific types of zoning to be requested and exactly what kind of commercial ventures would be allowed are yet to be determined.

“The goal has always been to generate some employment out here,” Deputy County Administrator for Community Development Jesse Smith said in an interview Monday. “A lot of that will be shaped as we go through the zoning process.”

The Chesterfield County Board of Supervisors is slated to authorize staff to create a rezoning application for about 1,850 acres of county-owned property near Moseley. (BizSense file)

If the application initiation is approved as planned on Wednesday’s consent agenda, at least one community meeting is expected to follow to solicit feedback and help craft the rezoning application.

The Planning Commission is expected to vote on the proposal in January, with the board’s final approval expected to take place in February, Smith said.

That timeline is driven by the desire for the new middle school to be operational in the area by 2024, Smith said, adding that some of the acreage could be set aside for additional future schools.

The rezoning project would pave the way for development of the lion’s share of the Upper Magnolia acreage the EDA bought for $13 million last year.

A proposed extension of Powhite Parkway cuts the area in half. Smith said a traffic study would be conducted as part of the rezoning process, and it remains to be seen how construction of the extension might come into play in the near future.

“We’ll have to see what’s determined to be needed,” Smith said. “Long term, we think Powhite Parkway needs to be there. It’s more a question of timing.”

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Carl Schwendeman
Carl Schwendeman
27 days ago

They really should look at creating a 1,000 acre park to preserve open space.
But this is Chesterfield county they live to ride their paving machines and run their chain saws.

Bobby Brock
Bobby Brock
27 days ago

Are you referring to the Largest State Park just a few miles down the road from here? Pocahontas is almost 8,000 acres of land. Not that I love sprawl, but we do live in a suburban county…it’s going to happen whether it’s county owned property or private land.

Don O'Keefe
Don O'Keefe
27 days ago

Wow, this is stunning… and incredibly sad. This is a vast area of forests, hills, and streams that is now going to be destroyed for more suburban sprawl. That they want to extend the Powhite Parkway into untouched woodlands this day and age is unimaginable. One tries to not to be hyperbolic, but this is one of the reasons why American urban planning (and American cities) are rightly considered amongst the most stupidly organized in the world. This news is nothing short of an ecological and social disaster…

Bobby Brock
Bobby Brock
27 days ago
Reply to  Don O'Keefe

Don, best way to keep the trees and streams the way you want them to be is to buy the land. Once you own it, you can dictate what you’d like to do with it…to a degree with your governments approval of course.

Leon Phoenix
Leon Phoenix
27 days ago

This is horrible. More suburban sprawl, more noise, more traffic, more pollution, fewer trees, and a lower quality of life for everyone….except for the greedy, wealthy developers and the politicians. They’re loving this. Thanks Chesterfield County for putting corporate interests over the interests of the people.

Ed Christina
Ed Christina
21 days ago
Reply to  Leon Phoenix

don’t tell me you are surprised?