Project with 530 residential units planned for site near Westchester Commons

westchester crescent communities 2

The Crescent Communities project proposed for a 43-acres site near Westchester Commons would feature more than 500 residential units, most of them apartments spread across several buildings that would front Midlothian Turnpike. (Images courtesy Chesterfield)

A North Carolina firm’s latest Richmond-region development would bring hundreds more residential units to the area around Westchester Commons.

Crescent Communities recently filed plans for more than 530 residential units and 12,000 square feet of commercial space for a site just west of the western Chesterfield shopping center close to the county’s border with Powhatan.

The development would rise on 43 acres at the corner of Huguenot Springs Road and Midlothian Turnpike next to The Aire at Westchester, a mixed-use development with 2,200 homes by HHHunt Communities that’s now underway.

The Crescent project, which is referred to in county records as Westchester Assemblage, would feature a range of residential units along with the commercial component.

There would be about 360 apartments spread across seven four-story buildings fronting Midlothian Turnpike, according to a site plan submitted to the county in April.

It would also feature about 160 two- and three-story townhomes, as well as 13 single-family homes.

The development would feature a commercial area split between about 10,000 square feet labeled “retail” and 2,000 labeled “coffee” closest to the Midlothian Turnpike and Huguenot Springs Road intersection.

There would also be a nearly 9,000-square-foot clubhouse, which would sit on a 1.5-acre open space area. The development’s perimeter would have buffers of 50 feet along Midlothian Turnpike and Huguenot Springs Road.

westchester crescent communities 1

Crescent Communities is planning a 530-unit residential project near Westchester Commons. About 12,000 square feet of commercial space would be built at the corner of Midlothian Turnpike and Huguenot Springs Road.

Three vehicular entrances would be created on Huguenot Springs, and one would be on the turnpike. The site plan doesn’t show any connectivity with the adjacent Aire project.

Crescent’s project site is on about 43 acres that are split across three parcels. The project site was most recently assessed at $4.6 million, per online land records. Most of the assemblage’s acreage is a parcel at 1401 Huguenot Springs Road owned by Foxdene LLC. About 15 acres is owned by funeral home Bliley’s. The rest is owned by the Marie Watson estate.

It appears that two homes on the property would be demolished to make way for the development.

Crescent is seeking a rezoning of the property to allow the project to proceed. The request will be reviewed by the Chesterfield Planning Commission, but a hearing date hasn’t been set yet.

After commissioners determine whether they will recommend approval of the proposal, the Board of Supervisors will render a final decision at a later date.

Crescent didn’t respond to requests for comment.

The company’s other Richmond-area projects include apartment complex Novel Scott’s Addition and a 500,000-square-foot warehouse called Axial Gateway 95 outside Colonial Heights, both of which are under construction.

westchester crescent communities 2

The Crescent Communities project proposed for a 43-acres site near Westchester Commons would feature more than 500 residential units, most of them apartments spread across several buildings that would front Midlothian Turnpike. (Images courtesy Chesterfield)

A North Carolina firm’s latest Richmond-region development would bring hundreds more residential units to the area around Westchester Commons.

Crescent Communities recently filed plans for more than 530 residential units and 12,000 square feet of commercial space for a site just west of the western Chesterfield shopping center close to the county’s border with Powhatan.

The development would rise on 43 acres at the corner of Huguenot Springs Road and Midlothian Turnpike next to The Aire at Westchester, a mixed-use development with 2,200 homes by HHHunt Communities that’s now underway.

The Crescent project, which is referred to in county records as Westchester Assemblage, would feature a range of residential units along with the commercial component.

There would be about 360 apartments spread across seven four-story buildings fronting Midlothian Turnpike, according to a site plan submitted to the county in April.

It would also feature about 160 two- and three-story townhomes, as well as 13 single-family homes.

The development would feature a commercial area split between about 10,000 square feet labeled “retail” and 2,000 labeled “coffee” closest to the Midlothian Turnpike and Huguenot Springs Road intersection.

There would also be a nearly 9,000-square-foot clubhouse, which would sit on a 1.5-acre open space area. The development’s perimeter would have buffers of 50 feet along Midlothian Turnpike and Huguenot Springs Road.

westchester crescent communities 1

Crescent Communities is planning a 530-unit residential project near Westchester Commons. About 12,000 square feet of commercial space would be built at the corner of Midlothian Turnpike and Huguenot Springs Road.

Three vehicular entrances would be created on Huguenot Springs, and one would be on the turnpike. The site plan doesn’t show any connectivity with the adjacent Aire project.

Crescent’s project site is on about 43 acres that are split across three parcels. The project site was most recently assessed at $4.6 million, per online land records. Most of the assemblage’s acreage is a parcel at 1401 Huguenot Springs Road owned by Foxdene LLC. About 15 acres is owned by funeral home Bliley’s. The rest is owned by the Marie Watson estate.

It appears that two homes on the property would be demolished to make way for the development.

Crescent is seeking a rezoning of the property to allow the project to proceed. The request will be reviewed by the Chesterfield Planning Commission, but a hearing date hasn’t been set yet.

After commissioners determine whether they will recommend approval of the proposal, the Board of Supervisors will render a final decision at a later date.

Crescent didn’t respond to requests for comment.

The company’s other Richmond-area projects include apartment complex Novel Scott’s Addition and a 500,000-square-foot warehouse called Axial Gateway 95 outside Colonial Heights, both of which are under construction.

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Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 month ago

Okay. Can we agree that this looks kinda nice?

Peter James
Peter James
1 month ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

Yes it does, Shawn. I like it.

George MacGuffin
George MacGuffin
1 month ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

If you click on the Crescent Communities photo above you will see a watermark for LandDesign: creating places that matter.
No irony.
Tell me what matters in this tenement zone? The small central pool? The provisional retail zone to the west?
I assume you’re speaking of the elevation photo looking nice. Do you think that feller on the fourth floor balcony thinks it’s kinda nice? Wonder what he’s contemplating? Will I survive a jump from here?

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 month ago

Again, you are a serial exaggerator. Tenements…. do they have only one bathroom per floor — fire escapes grafted on the front to meet modern codes?

Creating spaces that matter may be a bit pretentious but the overhangs and shades (I forget what those are called) are nice and there are some vertical elements that break up the monotony. Unlike most here, I do not compare things to perfect. Richmond is still a tier 3 city and these are the exurbs of a 3 tier city. What do you want? Are you typing out of San Diego, or even Raleigh?

George MacGuffin
George MacGuffin
1 month ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

Have you driven around Richmond? Witnessed the inordinate multitude of apartment complexes built in the 70’s and 80’s? Go take a ride to Southwood Parkway, Carnation Street, or around HorsePen…. Hilliard Rd, Marina Drive. Maybe a small pool. Some trees. Some retail. I bet people wanted to live there then. Now they’re tenements.
These developers need to think better beyond shade thingees. These are throw-away buildings. They represent 0 progress.
I don’t think most Richmonders of means realize how poor and ugly the majority of Richmond’s built environment truly is.
Get out of your bubbles.

Peter James
Peter James
1 month ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

Shawn – overhangs and shades: “awnings” is the only word that comes to mind, but I might be mistaken. Am I in the ballpark of what you’re thinking?

Garry Whelan
Garry Whelan
1 month ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

As long as you don’t consider facilities for the residents. That’s over 1,000 people who will have to leave their neighborhood and drive to access anything not provided in the 12,000 sq ft of retail and coffee. Another lollipop development off an arterial road. awful now, awful in the future.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 month ago
Reply to  Garry Whelan

Well, I am going to type this slowly: No one is forcing anyone to move there.

Further, people LIKE living in that general area — I can tell because the development looks more expensive in general.

Michael Morgan-Dodson
Michael Morgan-Dodson
1 month ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

Yeah but does anyone believe renderings….I mean come on you think they are going to plant THAT many trees around the site. It has been fields or farmland for 100 years plus and I doubt that they will save a single mature tree during construction.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 month ago

People seem to believe it when they are ugly, so….

George MacGuffin
George MacGuffin
1 month ago

The Powhanites to the west on the TPK are going to get a real kick out of these +500 residences in addition to the previously announced +2200 residences slated in the same general area. We all know that Contractorfield and VDOT won’t do an expansion/widening/new traffic pattern until there are at least a dozen more deaths and major vehicular accidents out that way. Hopefully,, these new residents will realize that there is nothing out in Powhatan beyond a Wal-Mart , a bait shop, and maybe a few kennels and the traffic will be mostly heading east. But they won’t have… Read more »

Peter James
Peter James
1 month ago

Contractorfield… 😂 Gotta admit, that made me chuckle.

“Nothing out in Powhatan…” — what’s the over/under a Sheetz will be in the works?

Apologies, folks – I couldn’t resist.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 month ago
Reply to  Peter James

No apologies necessary! A Sheetz for every hamlet — two per village!!!

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 month ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

(Shhhh…) I suspect he likes WaWa …

Peter James
Peter James
1 month ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

😂

Carl Schwendeman
Carl Schwendeman
1 month ago

They called four houses on 1 acre in the Village of Powhatan to dense. Chesterfield is not shy about density when the Arie went before the Chesterfield Planning and Supervisors only 4 people showed up.

Carl Schwendeman
Carl Schwendeman
1 month ago

I got a update from Chesterfield’s Transportation Department and it looks like they are going to ask for a sidewalk along Route 60 and Huguenot Springs Road. This will make this the trail head for any sidewalk attempt into Eastern Powhatan County along Route 60 and on to Powhatan Courthouse.

Frank Wood
Frank Wood
1 month ago

VDOT needs to correct the N. Otterdale Road eastbound turn lane….it overfills and spills out on to the thru lanes making it exceedingly dangerous for thru traffic.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 month ago

And yet…. people LIKE living out in Powhatan….. and the developments out there look expensive and more attractive than most places around Richmond…

Carl Schwendeman
Carl Schwendeman
1 month ago

This development needs to have a street link to the Watkins Center next door to avoid this local traffic having to go out on Route 60. This project also needs a bike path along Route 60 and a sidewalk or bike path along Huguenot Springs. And the wooden bridge from 1945 on Huguenot Springs needs to be replaced with a modern flood prof overpass. And all of Huguenot Springs needs to be reconstructed with shoulders and sidewalk.

Frank Wood
Frank Wood
1 month ago

Only a lunatic would bike Route 60 at Westchester Commons – the activity at the 288 interchanges makes it too chaotic for riders.

Michael Morgan-Dodson
Michael Morgan-Dodson
1 month ago

Ms. Watson and her late husband were so kind; never knew the relationship other than families that lived near each other but if you knew the the Watkins (and got in trouble as teens in the 1990s in Midlo), you knew the Ms Watson. Hard working lady but understood we were just teens having fun! My memory is the Huguenot Spring structure is a large barn not a house. The main house is off Midlothian and has to be 120 years or older. She died in December and was buried in Powhatan. Ironically Woody Funeral home handled her arrangements. I… Read more »

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 month ago

Yep. Happens. I grew up in a housing development (small 3br single family homes) that was built in the 1920s. The Deeds made clear that the whole area was once the ________ Farm. Our town still has farmers cashing out, and people still wish it wasn’t happening. And when people propose building apts…….. they get angry.

Carl Schwendeman
Carl Schwendeman
1 month ago

They need to include preserving the 120 year old house and the giant barn. The giant barn could become some indoor store or gathering place or restaurant while the house could be become a house or office.
The giant barn in the back is impressive. And the house and swimming pool could become a club house or something. It is a piece of history and should be protected.

George MacGuffin
George MacGuffin
1 month ago

Developers are born of the box.

Little boxes on the hillside,
Little boxes made of ticky tacky,
Little boxes on the hillside,
Little boxes all the same.

And the boys go into business
And marry and raise a family
In boxes made of ticky tacky
And they all look just the same.
There’s a green one and a pink one
And a blue one and a yellow one,
And they’re all made out of ticky tacky
And they all look just the same

JD Thomas
JD Thomas
1 month ago

My gosh, enough already. the western edge of chesterfield is nothing but apartments where there used to be trees and nature.
I think this is more Watkins property getting developed. ENOUGH!

George MacGuffin
George MacGuffin
1 month ago
Reply to  JD Thomas

Probably the $ grubbing late offspring. Even selling off the homestead. In another generation they’ll have nothing.