Sausage-maker’s new restaurant, meat counter to replace Carytown Cupcakes

hots brats mayor

Sausage company The Mayor Meats and its pop-up brand Hots & Brats are planning to take over the Carytown Cupcakes space in Richmond. (Courtesy Hots & Brats)

As Carytown Cupcakes eyes its last day of business later this month, there’s been a change of plans for what’s next at the bakery’s storefront.

Local sausage company The Mayor Meats and its pop-up brand Hots & Brats are taking over at 3111 W. Cary St. later this year with a new meat counter and restaurant.

It marks a new direction for the space that had for a time been eyed by pop-up Young Mother for a brick-and-mortar location.

The Mayor Meats owner Kyle Morse said the brick-and-mortar version of Hots & Brats will have largely similar offerings to the pop-up but with an expanded menu focused on hot dogs and other sausages, such as wursts.

Morse described the restaurant as a casual eatery and said it would also sell beer and wine. It’ll have seating for 20 to 30 people.

“The point is to come in and grab a quick bite with your whole family,” Morse said.

Past Hots & Brats pop-up events have featured kimchi hot dogs and linguica, a Portuguese sausage, with goat cheese and caramelized onions on the menu.

Also moving into the space is The Mayor, which will have a meat counter in the restaurant where people can buy house-made sausages by the pound. Morse said he plans to add bacon and ham to the offerings once the business is in the new space.

Morse said a cost estimate on build-out and equipment for the space was still being worked out. WillHouse Construction has been tapped to serve as the general contractor for the project.

The Mayor is currently based at food-and-beverage incubator Hatch in Manchester and will relocate its production operations to Carytown. The sausage-maker sources most of its meats from Heritage Foods USA in New York.

The company’s products can be found at local stores including Ellwood Thompson’s and Stella’s Grocery, among others. The Mayor also sells sausage to local restaurants and at farmers markets.

Morse started The Mayor in 2019 and rolled out the Hots & Brats brand last year. In 2018, he moved to the area from New York City, where the Culinary Institute of America graduate worked in the fine-dining scene.

As Morse plots his entry into the neighborhood, Carytown Cupcakes is winding down. The bakery plans to close June 23, after more than a decade in business.

Previously there were plans for chef Daniel Harthausen of HBO fame to take over the bakery’s space with a brick-and-mortar version of his pop-up Young Mother, which served Korean- and Japanese-influenced dishes.

However, those plans are now off the table and Harthausen has taken a job with Late Air, a wine bar in Savannah, Georgia, online news outlet Eater reported.

young mother carytown cupcakes scaled

Carytown Cupcakes plans to close later in June. Previously, Young Mother was slated to take over the space but that’s no longer planned.

Morse was teed up for the Carytown Cupcakes space through his connection with Kevin Liu, a co-owner of the bakery and Morse’s business partner in The Mayor’s jump to brick and mortar.

The duo met in early 2019 and became friends after Morse held a pop-up at Liu’s neighboring restaurant The Jasper.

Morse said Liu reached out to solicit ideas on what to do with the Carytown Cupcakes space after the Young Mother project fell apart, and that conversations then turned to Morse bringing his sausage company to the space instead.

Morse said The Mayor’s upcoming permanent retail space, which will be a first for the company, has been a goal of his since launching the company several years ago.

“I’ve been thinking about it for some time. Having one place to call home will make things easier on my end, and it’s something I’ve already been building toward,” he said.

hots brats mayor

Sausage company The Mayor Meats and its pop-up brand Hots & Brats are planning to take over the Carytown Cupcakes space in Richmond. (Courtesy Hots & Brats)

As Carytown Cupcakes eyes its last day of business later this month, there’s been a change of plans for what’s next at the bakery’s storefront.

Local sausage company The Mayor Meats and its pop-up brand Hots & Brats are taking over at 3111 W. Cary St. later this year with a new meat counter and restaurant.

It marks a new direction for the space that had for a time been eyed by pop-up Young Mother for a brick-and-mortar location.

The Mayor Meats owner Kyle Morse said the brick-and-mortar version of Hots & Brats will have largely similar offerings to the pop-up but with an expanded menu focused on hot dogs and other sausages, such as wursts.

Morse described the restaurant as a casual eatery and said it would also sell beer and wine. It’ll have seating for 20 to 30 people.

“The point is to come in and grab a quick bite with your whole family,” Morse said.

Past Hots & Brats pop-up events have featured kimchi hot dogs and linguica, a Portuguese sausage, with goat cheese and caramelized onions on the menu.

Also moving into the space is The Mayor, which will have a meat counter in the restaurant where people can buy house-made sausages by the pound. Morse said he plans to add bacon and ham to the offerings once the business is in the new space.

Morse said a cost estimate on build-out and equipment for the space was still being worked out. WillHouse Construction has been tapped to serve as the general contractor for the project.

The Mayor is currently based at food-and-beverage incubator Hatch in Manchester and will relocate its production operations to Carytown. The sausage-maker sources most of its meats from Heritage Foods USA in New York.

The company’s products can be found at local stores including Ellwood Thompson’s and Stella’s Grocery, among others. The Mayor also sells sausage to local restaurants and at farmers markets.

Morse started The Mayor in 2019 and rolled out the Hots & Brats brand last year. In 2018, he moved to the area from New York City, where the Culinary Institute of America graduate worked in the fine-dining scene.

As Morse plots his entry into the neighborhood, Carytown Cupcakes is winding down. The bakery plans to close June 23, after more than a decade in business.

Previously there were plans for chef Daniel Harthausen of HBO fame to take over the bakery’s space with a brick-and-mortar version of his pop-up Young Mother, which served Korean- and Japanese-influenced dishes.

However, those plans are now off the table and Harthausen has taken a job with Late Air, a wine bar in Savannah, Georgia, online news outlet Eater reported.

young mother carytown cupcakes scaled

Carytown Cupcakes plans to close later in June. Previously, Young Mother was slated to take over the space but that’s no longer planned.

Morse was teed up for the Carytown Cupcakes space through his connection with Kevin Liu, a co-owner of the bakery and Morse’s business partner in The Mayor’s jump to brick and mortar.

The duo met in early 2019 and became friends after Morse held a pop-up at Liu’s neighboring restaurant The Jasper.

Morse said Liu reached out to solicit ideas on what to do with the Carytown Cupcakes space after the Young Mother project fell apart, and that conversations then turned to Morse bringing his sausage company to the space instead.

Morse said The Mayor’s upcoming permanent retail space, which will be a first for the company, has been a goal of his since launching the company several years ago.

“I’ve been thinking about it for some time. Having one place to call home will make things easier on my end, and it’s something I’ve already been building toward,” he said.

Your subscription has expired. Renew now by choosing a subscription below!

For more informaiton, head over to your profile.

Profile


SUBSCRIBE NOW

 — 

 — 

 — 

TERMS OF SERVICE:

ALL MEMBERSHIPS RENEW AUTOMATICALLY. YOU WILL BE CHARGED FOR A 1 YEAR MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL AT THE RATE IN EFFECT AT THAT TIME UNLESS YOU CANCEL YOUR MEMBERSHIP BY LOGGING IN OR BY CONTACTING [email protected].

ALL CHARGES FOR MONTHLY OR ANNUAL MEMBERSHIPS ARE NONREFUNDABLE.

EACH MEMBERSHIP WILL ONLY FUNCTION ON UP TO 3 MACHINES. ACCOUNTS ABUSING THAT LIMIT WILL BE DISCONTINUED.

FOR ASSISTANCE WITH YOUR MEMBERSHIP PLEASE EMAIL [email protected]




Return to Homepage

POSTED IN Restaurants

Editor's Picks

Subscribe
Notify of
guest

14 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Richard Rumrill
Richard Rumrill
29 days ago

May be just me, but a place that sells Portuguese sausage gives Richmond a more international flavor than a bougie cup-cake place.

Arnold Hager
Arnold Hager
29 days ago

You are easy to impress. How about America being the international destination for people of the world since the founding or haven’t you noticed. Do you know where the cupcake people are from?

Arnold Hager
Arnold Hager
28 days ago

Judging by all the down votes I thought maybe I misunderstood your post- after further review I don’t think so. I think your use of the word bougie describing the cupcake place triggers me. Why disparage your neighbors? Richmond as well as America is full of international people but they don’t all make and sell Portuguese sausage or cupcakes.

Richard Rumrill
Richard Rumrill
27 days ago
Reply to  Arnold Hager

Bougie was a bad word choice, and while Carytown cupcakes had a great product in my opinion the idea was a bit fru fru which I guess is even more snobbish. I did not intend to be demeaning. However, I did spend 15 years of my life in other countries and I think it would be hard to argue that America has done a good job importing the best dessert cultures. American desserts tend to be way too large and sweet. A friend of mine said the reason we have a ‘low’ dessert culture is we are not a ‘bougie’… Read more »

George MacGuffin
George MacGuffin
29 days ago

“Morse described the restaurant as a casual eatery…”
Thank you for sewing up any confusion about a hot dog shop.

Dare I say there is a ribald joke in here about Richmond getting more of the Mayor’s sausage

Last edited 29 days ago by George MacGuffin
Michael Morgan-Dodson
Michael Morgan-Dodson
29 days ago

I just don’t get how you’re “family friendly” if you have $13 hotdogs.

Drinks anywhere run you about $3 bucks a pop unless you get a free cup of water. So 4 dogs and 4 sodas will run you around $72 including taxes, and that’s without a tip!

Adding a 20% tip and you’re talking close to $85 for hotdogs and soda.

Bob Wilkus
Bob Wilkus
28 days ago

Family friendly doesn’t have anything to do with price. Maybe your family would enjoy a night at 7-11

Wes Morgan
Wes Morgan
28 days ago
Reply to  Bob Wilkus

I’d encourage you to spend more time with ordinary, working class people to get a sense of their world.

Jay Emory
Jay Emory
28 days ago
Reply to  Wes Morgan

While I do not disagree that $85 is outrageous for hot dogs and drinks, not every restaurant is geared towards working class people.

Lee Thomas
Lee Thomas
28 days ago
Reply to  Jay Emory

For something that’s locally made m/gourmet/specialty, this doesn’t (sadly) sound expensive at all these days, comparatively…

Wes Morgan
Wes Morgan
28 days ago
Reply to  Jay Emory

I don’t disagree, but I was responding to the “7-11” comment.

Craig Davis
Craig Davis
28 days ago
Reply to  Wes Morgan

“Working class people” like baseball (so do I). Try taking a family of 4 to a squirrels game and getting them hotdogs, drinks and maybe a cold beer for dear old dad (ie me) and see what that runs you. “Craft” food like craft beer etc., costs more than mass produced options. Go check out Belmont Butchery – awesome meats but it costs more than the Oscar Meyer in the meat section at Kroger. End of the day no one is making anyone buy something they don’t want to. The constant trolling and trashing of people starting businesses on this… Read more »

George MacGuffin
George MacGuffin
28 days ago
Reply to  Craig Davis

Working class folk rest easy! Y’all can cancel your bi-annual hot-dog trip to Carytown because you can still get $1.50 dugout dogs under Costco’s fluorescent lights.

George MacGuffin
George MacGuffin
28 days ago
Reply to  Bob Wilkus

“I would be happy to suggest these new pretzel rods. They’re made by an oil company!” -Apu Nahasapeemapetilon