Trolley station overhaul stays on schedule

The former trolley station at 814 W. Broad St. (Photos by Mark Robinson)

The former trolley station at 814 W. Broad St. (Photos by Mark Robinson)

The redevelopment of an old trolley station on Broad Street is on track.

Renovations should be done by December.

Renovations are expected to be complete by December.

VCU has begun renovations on the 18,000-square-foot building at 814 W. Broad St. The property was previously an old trolley station and most recently was home to the Richmond Glass Shop.

VCU bought the property in February for $2.1 million. The university hired Richmond-based TRENT as the general contractor and Commonwealth Architects on the $6.8 million project.

The property also includes two warehouses on Marshall Street with an additional 8,500 square feet.

When complete, the space will house programs from the School of the Arts.

VCU head of facilities management Brian Ohlinger told BizSense in March that the renovations should be done by December. The project will seek historic tax credits.

The former trolley station at 814 W. Broad St. (Photos by Mark Robinson)

The former trolley station at 814 W. Broad St. (Photos by Mark Robinson)

The redevelopment of an old trolley station on Broad Street is on track.

Renovations should be done by December.

Renovations are expected to be complete by December.

VCU has begun renovations on the 18,000-square-foot building at 814 W. Broad St. The property was previously an old trolley station and most recently was home to the Richmond Glass Shop.

VCU bought the property in February for $2.1 million. The university hired Richmond-based TRENT as the general contractor and Commonwealth Architects on the $6.8 million project.

The property also includes two warehouses on Marshall Street with an additional 8,500 square feet.

When complete, the space will house programs from the School of the Arts.

VCU head of facilities management Brian Ohlinger told BizSense in March that the renovations should be done by December. The project will seek historic tax credits.

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Brian
Brian
9 years ago

Not just a trolley station, the main terminal of the trolley line which ran between Richmond and Ashland. You can still ID chunks of the right of way pretty easily if you know where to look.

Stuart
Stuart
9 years ago

Not a trolley line at all, it was the southern terminus of the Richmond and Chesapeake Bay Rwy, a high-speed electric RR that used pantographs on the vehicles to draw power through overhead catenary. Those cars could go as fast as 90mph!

R Sweeney
R Sweeney
9 years ago

I believe the more precise term to describe the Richmond& Chsp. Bay RR is “interurban line”.