VCU surgeon buys July’s highest-priced home

The home at 4105 Exeter Road topped July's residential sales. Photos courtesy of CVRMLS.

The home at 4105 Exeter Road topped July’s residential sales. Photos courtesy of CVRMLS.

A 21st-century house in the middle of a 20th-century neighborhood was the highest-priced home sold in Richmond last month.

Built in 2009, the house at 4105 Exeter Road in the city’s nearly century-old Windsor Farms neighborhood sold July 15 for $1.67 million, according to the Central Virginia Regional Multiple Listing Service. That was just less than its listing three months earlier at $1.79 million.

The buyers are listed in city property records as Alex B. and Patricia C. Valadka. Alex Valadka was recently hired as chair of VCU School of Medicine’s Department of Neurosurgery.

Christopher Small of Small & Associates represented the buyer and said the sale was unusual for Windsor Farms in that the property was a teardown, meaning the house was built to replace an older home that was razed.

“Richmond hasn’t had that many teardowns,” he said. “In Windsor Farms, you tend to have houses where people put big additions on them. The way to make it attractive to a buyer today is to make a big addition.

The home is about 7,600 square feet.

The home is about 7,600 square feet.

“There are so many houses in there where people have added additions that are as large as, or larger than, the original house,” he said. “And then there are houses like the one here where they just said: ‘We want a new house in this location.’”

Situated on a half-acre lot, the 2½-story house consists of 16 rooms spanning more than 7,200 square feet. It has five bedrooms, 4½ bathrooms and several custom features, including three home theaters and audio, intercom and security camera systems that run throughout the house.

The property also includes a three-car garage designed to match the home’s architecture. The garage also features a playroom or “sports cave.”

Small said the buyers were attracted to the house because it was new construction in an older part of the city.

“They looked at old houses; they looked at houses on Monument Avenue,” he said. “They don’t have a problem with an older house, but they like the idea of owning a house that had a more open floor plan and was brighter and more current than something that had been retrofitted.”

Small said the sale was also unusual in that another interested party made offers after the sale. While the buyers could have profited from accepting those offers, Small said, they chose to turn them down and hold onto the house.

“If they had chosen to do it, they could have sold it for considerably more than the price that is reported,” Small said. “They were willing to pay considerably more – hundreds of thousands of dollars more – and my buyers were like, ‘No. Every time we see it, we like it better.’

“It was not your average real estate deal.”

The second-highest home sold in the Richmond in July was just west of Windsor Farms in Westmoreland Place. That house, at 204 Virginia Ave., sold for its listed price of $1.42 million.

Rounding out the top five were, all in western Henrico County:
• 9000 River Trace Court: $1.35 million
• 19 W. Glenbrooke Circle: $1.18 million
• 8207 Bevlynn Way, Henrico: $1.08 million

The home at 4105 Exeter Road topped July's residential sales. Photos courtesy of CVRMLS.

The home at 4105 Exeter Road topped July’s residential sales. Photos courtesy of CVRMLS.

A 21st-century house in the middle of a 20th-century neighborhood was the highest-priced home sold in Richmond last month.

Built in 2009, the house at 4105 Exeter Road in the city’s nearly century-old Windsor Farms neighborhood sold July 15 for $1.67 million, according to the Central Virginia Regional Multiple Listing Service. That was just less than its listing three months earlier at $1.79 million.

The buyers are listed in city property records as Alex B. and Patricia C. Valadka. Alex Valadka was recently hired as chair of VCU School of Medicine’s Department of Neurosurgery.

Christopher Small of Small & Associates represented the buyer and said the sale was unusual for Windsor Farms in that the property was a teardown, meaning the house was built to replace an older home that was razed.

“Richmond hasn’t had that many teardowns,” he said. “In Windsor Farms, you tend to have houses where people put big additions on them. The way to make it attractive to a buyer today is to make a big addition.

The home is about 7,600 square feet.

The home is about 7,600 square feet.

“There are so many houses in there where people have added additions that are as large as, or larger than, the original house,” he said. “And then there are houses like the one here where they just said: ‘We want a new house in this location.’”

Situated on a half-acre lot, the 2½-story house consists of 16 rooms spanning more than 7,200 square feet. It has five bedrooms, 4½ bathrooms and several custom features, including three home theaters and audio, intercom and security camera systems that run throughout the house.

The property also includes a three-car garage designed to match the home’s architecture. The garage also features a playroom or “sports cave.”

Small said the buyers were attracted to the house because it was new construction in an older part of the city.

“They looked at old houses; they looked at houses on Monument Avenue,” he said. “They don’t have a problem with an older house, but they like the idea of owning a house that had a more open floor plan and was brighter and more current than something that had been retrofitted.”

Small said the sale was also unusual in that another interested party made offers after the sale. While the buyers could have profited from accepting those offers, Small said, they chose to turn them down and hold onto the house.

“If they had chosen to do it, they could have sold it for considerably more than the price that is reported,” Small said. “They were willing to pay considerably more – hundreds of thousands of dollars more – and my buyers were like, ‘No. Every time we see it, we like it better.’

“It was not your average real estate deal.”

The second-highest home sold in the Richmond in July was just west of Windsor Farms in Westmoreland Place. That house, at 204 Virginia Ave., sold for its listed price of $1.42 million.

Rounding out the top five were, all in western Henrico County:
• 9000 River Trace Court: $1.35 million
• 19 W. Glenbrooke Circle: $1.18 million
• 8207 Bevlynn Way, Henrico: $1.08 million

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SusanMarusco
SusanMarusco
7 years ago

Gees, and I thought Obamacare was supposed to be so bad for doctors. Guess we got millions more people covered, medical inflation has been trending down, patients have more consumer protections. And Docs are still trucking. Not bad news. 🙂

Mika Hakkinen
Mika Hakkinen
7 years ago

Columns are spaced weirdly, dormers are clunky and windows look like they have prison grilles over them. The few details are poverty-spec. McMansion interior. Oh well.