Sur La Table the latest tenant to ditch Stony Point Fashion Park

Sur La Table filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy Wednesday. Pictured: an Upper East Side location in New York City. (Courtesy Wikimedia Commons)

Stony Point Fashion Park is losing yet another tenant, this time a national cookware retailer that’s gone into bankruptcy.

Sur La Table plans to close at Stony Point for good. It’s the Seattle-based chain’s only location in the Richmond region.

An assistant manager confirmed on Wednesday the store would permanently close, along with other stores throughout the country. The manager didn’t know the exact date the Stony Point location would shutter. She referred further questions to the company’s corporate headquarters.

The company announced Wednesday it had filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy. It intends to restructure and pursue a sale of the entire company, subject to court approval. In its Wednesday announcement, the company didn’t elaborate on its plans to close stores. The company seeks permission to continue to operate stores during bankruptcy proceedings.

Sur La Table’s public relations department didn’t respond to an inquiry Wednesday.

Sur La Table, which sells cookware, cutlery and other kitchen items, closed its Stony Point location and its other roughly 120 locations in response to the coronavirus pandemic in March, and in recent weeks has reopened stores. The Stony Point location is still currently open.

The Seattle Times reported in late June that Sur La Table had plans to lay off corporate employees and would close potentially five stores.

The privately held company has three other Virginia locations, according to its website, all in Northern Virginia.

Stony Point has struggled to keep its tenants. (BizSense file photo by Mike Platania)

Sur La Table’s pending departure is the latest blow to Stony Point, which has struggled to keep tenants, forcing a change in the mall’s ownership. Panera recently shut down its location at the mall. H&M also recently closed its 20,000-square-foot store at the mall less than three years after it opened.

In June, BizSense reported that national gym chain Life Time had ended consideration of the mall for a new location.

Starwood Retail Partners, which had owned the mall since 2014, lost ownership this year after it fell behind on loan payments. The mall now is operated by a special servicer, which manages troubled commercial mortgage-backed securities loans.

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Bruce Milam
Bruce Milam
4 months ago

Rte 288 rang the death knell for The Regency, Stony Point and, to some extent, Virginia Center Commons, as it made Short Pump so accessible. Covid is just closing the casket on this property. Clearly, a mixed use of high end residential works at this location and perhaps first floor retail can return to service the new population there.

Fred Squire
Fred Squire
4 months ago
Reply to  Bruce Milam

Add brooks brothers to the list for this doomed mall

This place couldn’t find its way out of a paper bag with a map and flashlight

Michael Dodson
Michael Dodson
4 months ago
Reply to  Fred Squire

If they can get a good manager/owner they might be able to convince stores to leave Chesterfield Town Center. Debt is gone and bones are good. I never understood H&M’s decision to close here and keep open the store at the ” OK corral Town Center” which now averages a couple of fights and weapons issues each year and now has its first murder. To me Chesterfield Towne Center is following the path of Cloverleaf. But with retail overall closing (Carytown is loosing Ruby Boutique across from closed Need store) all malls, centers and shopping districts are going to take… Read more »

Fred Squire
Fred Squire
4 months ago
Reply to  Michael Dodson

They filed chapter 11, I don’t think you will need to wait long for brooks brothers

Matt Faris
Matt Faris
3 months ago
Reply to  Michael Dodson

Malls seem to have about a 30 year productive life (Chesterfield Mall – now Towne Center, had a much slower start than Cloverleaf). Then it’s all downhill. I can’t image any mall being successful in the retail climate of the ’20s.

J. Jackson
J. Jackson
4 months ago

Yikes. Maybe these empty stores can become restaurants with spacious socially distanced seating?

Ed Christina
Ed Christina
4 months ago
Reply to  J. Jackson

If you walk though the mall, there is an enclosed area that would be perfect for an outdoor cafe. It is the area near where the coffe shop is, all you need to add is some table and umbrellas.

Steve Fox
Steve Fox
4 months ago

Worst location for a mall I’ve ever seen. Add in high end, expensive stores and it was doomed to failure. I hope Cinebistro moves to a new location within the area.

Brian Glass
Brian Glass
4 months ago

Can Dillards, which was oversized to begin with, survive at Stony Point? I think not !This Mall will definitely have to be reinvented, and it won’t be as a mall.

karl hott
karl hott
4 months ago

Surprised they haven’t broke ground for mixed use yet. The public seems to love overpriced apartments in recent years.

Ricky LaFleur
Ricky LaFleur
4 months ago
Reply to  karl hott

What do you mean? Your definition of overpriced in your comment is nothing more than a random opinion (on what it is based, we do not know). The demand sets the price of an apartment. If someone is willing to rent an apartment for a given amount of money, then that is the going rate and it is not overpriced because they have just agreed to pay it, right?

Adrienne Thurston
Adrienne Thurston
4 months ago

I believe a good use would be to create artist rented spaces. Recording studio, printing press, multi use galleries and work space studios. Possible radio station. Why does every business have to be a national chain? As well if national chains are interested why dont they ever open in downtown Richmond?

Garry Whelan
Garry Whelan
4 months ago

The whole point of malls was to create a downtown shopping experience on safe, suburban private land with ample free parking where nice people could go about their retail in a theme park version of the real thing. America has culturally embraced that model for decades and many chains have business models built entirely around it.
Getting them to repopulate downtown is an interesting ask.

Deon Hamner
Deon Hamner
4 months ago

It’s just one blow after another for this mall.. CineBistro must remain in Richmond.

Leigh Mills
Leigh Mills
4 months ago

Short Pump is a destination mall; Stony Point is not. In this age of retail, both can not survive.
Mixed use perhaps…VCU seems to be taking all the space around the perimeter of Stony Point Mall.

Michael Dodson
Michael Dodson
4 months ago
Reply to  Leigh Mills

Look at recent bankruptcies. New York and Co announced today it is filing and probably closing all their stores. Chesterfield and Short Pump will loose. Stony Point has it issues but ALL RETAIL centers are going to see some tough times ahead.