Chesterfield approves $25M contract to extend Nash Road toward government complex

chesterfield administration building scaled

The Chesterfield County Administration Building at 9901 Lori Road. (BizSense file)

An eight-figure road extension project has been teed up to address congestion in the area around Chesterfield’s county government offices.

The Chesterfield Board of Supervisors voted Wednesday to approve a contract with Wagman Heavy Civil to construct a less-than-a-mile extension of Nash Road (Route 636) to connect northeastward with Iron Bridge Road (Route 10).

The project includes a new signalized intersection where Nash Road is planned to meet Iron Bridge Road, a roundabout on Nash and Beach roads and a 600-foot-long bridge over a portion of Swift Creek.

The new 0.8-mile roadway is planned to feature a lane in both directions as well as a paved 4-foot shoulder on both sides of the road, Chesterfield Senior Engineer Bill Arel said in an interview this week. The project does not include any dedicated pedestrian or bicycle pathways.

The new Iron Bridge and Nash intersection is planned to feature two turn lanes in the direction of Route 288.

The total budget for the project is $35 million, which includes the $25.1 million construction contract for Wagman along with other expenses like right-of-way acquisition, design work and project contingency funds, Arel said.

Construction is slated to start this fall. The project is anticipated to be completed in spring 2026. Chesterfield has earmarked $25 million of its own funds toward the project’s budget, plus another $10 million provided by the state.

JMT is the project’s engineer.

nash road extension chesterfield

The route of the Nash Road extension project is shown in red. The project would include a new signalized intersection on Iron Bridge Road and a bridge over Swift Creek. (Courtesy Chesterfield County)

Arel said the project is intended to improve the movement of traffic in the area. Beach Road links ups with Iron Bridge south of the upcoming new Nash and Iron Bridge intersection, so the expectation is the road extension will further distribute traffic traveling on Iron Bridge and generally improve transportation in the area.

“It’s going to hopefully achieve a few things at once. We have an intersection at Beach and Nash that tends to back up. (The extension) will give relief on Route 10 and keep traffic flowing that way, and give us some network redundancy if there’s an incident on Beach or high waters on Swift Creek,” Arel said.

Chesterfield received four bids in early August for the project that ranged from $25.1 million to $28.4 million. Wagman’s bid was determined to be the “lowest responsive and responsible” bid, according to a county staff report.

Wagman’s bid exceeded an initial cost estimate by 23 percent, and to make up the shortfall the board on Wednesday approved a transfer of $6.1 million to address the funding gap and cover the contract bid. Arel said the increased costs associated with the project could be chalked up to recent increases in construction expenses industry-wide.

chesterfield administration building scaled

The Chesterfield County Administration Building at 9901 Lori Road. (BizSense file)

An eight-figure road extension project has been teed up to address congestion in the area around Chesterfield’s county government offices.

The Chesterfield Board of Supervisors voted Wednesday to approve a contract with Wagman Heavy Civil to construct a less-than-a-mile extension of Nash Road (Route 636) to connect northeastward with Iron Bridge Road (Route 10).

The project includes a new signalized intersection where Nash Road is planned to meet Iron Bridge Road, a roundabout on Nash and Beach roads and a 600-foot-long bridge over a portion of Swift Creek.

The new 0.8-mile roadway is planned to feature a lane in both directions as well as a paved 4-foot shoulder on both sides of the road, Chesterfield Senior Engineer Bill Arel said in an interview this week. The project does not include any dedicated pedestrian or bicycle pathways.

The new Iron Bridge and Nash intersection is planned to feature two turn lanes in the direction of Route 288.

The total budget for the project is $35 million, which includes the $25.1 million construction contract for Wagman along with other expenses like right-of-way acquisition, design work and project contingency funds, Arel said.

Construction is slated to start this fall. The project is anticipated to be completed in spring 2026. Chesterfield has earmarked $25 million of its own funds toward the project’s budget, plus another $10 million provided by the state.

JMT is the project’s engineer.

nash road extension chesterfield

The route of the Nash Road extension project is shown in red. The project would include a new signalized intersection on Iron Bridge Road and a bridge over Swift Creek. (Courtesy Chesterfield County)

Arel said the project is intended to improve the movement of traffic in the area. Beach Road links ups with Iron Bridge south of the upcoming new Nash and Iron Bridge intersection, so the expectation is the road extension will further distribute traffic traveling on Iron Bridge and generally improve transportation in the area.

“It’s going to hopefully achieve a few things at once. We have an intersection at Beach and Nash that tends to back up. (The extension) will give relief on Route 10 and keep traffic flowing that way, and give us some network redundancy if there’s an incident on Beach or high waters on Swift Creek,” Arel said.

Chesterfield received four bids in early August for the project that ranged from $25.1 million to $28.4 million. Wagman’s bid was determined to be the “lowest responsive and responsible” bid, according to a county staff report.

Wagman’s bid exceeded an initial cost estimate by 23 percent, and to make up the shortfall the board on Wednesday approved a transfer of $6.1 million to address the funding gap and cover the contract bid. Arel said the increased costs associated with the project could be chalked up to recent increases in construction expenses industry-wide.

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Zach Rugar
Zach Rugar
9 months ago

Only thing I wish is that they would build more roundabouts along Rt10 to slow people down more.

Roundabouts would work better especially during low traffic hours in order to keep the road clear.

Last edited 9 months ago by Zach Rugar
Carl Schwendeman
Carl Schwendeman
9 months ago

They should have built a sidewalk or bike path along it due to it being a lot cheaper to built the sidewalk with a new road then 20 years later were you have to redo everything. Now it will be 3 to 5 times more expensive to add a sidewalk or bike path.

At times Chesterfield County can be the poster child for giving out massive automobile substitutes while telling pedestrains your on your own kid we don’t have the money.

Zach Rugar
Zach Rugar
9 months ago

Chesterfield literally has no common sense, look at the stupid wide superstreets they are building! It would have cost more but they should have elevated a freeway above Rt 10 and narrowed down the current road to two lanes each way as a frontage road. Then if you stuff the frontage roads under the freeway bridge, you should have plenty of room afterwards for a nice multi-use path on both sides.