The Virginia Home to sell Byrd Park facility and relocate to Hanover

virginia home 3 scaled

The Virginia Home at 1101 Hampton St. in Richmond. The nonprofit is planning to sell the 130-bed facility and build a replacement residential facility for disabled adults in Hanover County. (Jack Jacobs photos)

After nearly a century overlooking Byrd Park, a Richmond home for adults with disabilities is preparing for a move to the suburbs.

The Virginia Home is in the early stages of a relocation to Hanover County, a process that will include selling its 130-bed facility at 1101 Hampton St. in Richmond, the nonprofit’s CEO Doug Vaughan said Thursday.

Proceeds from the sale of the Richmond property would go toward a new, larger facility to be built near the intersection of Pole Green and Bell Creek roads in eastern Hanover.

The Hampton Street facility, where The Virginia Home provides nursing and therapy services to residents, dates to the 1930s. While the facility has been expanded twice over the decades, there is no longer enough space on the property for the nonprofit to grow, Vaughan said.

The Richmond facility sits on a nearly 2-acre site occupied by a five- and six-story building fronting Hampton Street, as well as an attached annex on South Meadow Street. The facility, which hadn’t yet been listed for sale, overlooks Swan Lake and Shields Lake at Byrd Park.

The property was most recently assessed at $18.2 million, according to online city land records. The site is zoned single-family residential (R-5).

virginia home 4 scaled

The Virginia Home has operated at 1101 Hampton St., which overlooks Byrd Park, since the 1930s.

In Hanover, The Virginia Home is planning a new 160-bed facility. The nonprofit will need both state regulatory approval for the increased resident capacity as well as a rezoning from the Hanover Board of Supervisors to build the new facility, Vaughan said.

He declined to comment further on the anticipated size or cost of the Hanover project, saying that planning was still underway.

Vaughan also declined to share the exact location of the planned Hanover project, other than to say it would rise on a 71-acre undeveloped site near Pole Green and Bell Creek roads. The nonprofit has the site under contract, and is planning to relocate there around late 2027, he said.

The Virginia Home plans to file an application to the state’s certificate of public need (COPN) program later this month to allow more residents at its planned Hanover facility. In Virginia, certain medical and healthcare facilities and equipment require approval from the state’s health commissioner before they can be established.

The organization, formerly known as The Virginia Home for Incurables, opened its first eight-resident home on the former Ross Street (now Governor Street) in 1894. The organization moved to Hampton Street by 1931, and rebranded to its current name in the 1960s, according to a history on the organization’s website.

In 2022, The Virginia Home reported $30.9 million in revenue and a net income of $8.5 million, according to tax filings. The organization has 240 employees.

virginia home 3 scaled

The Virginia Home at 1101 Hampton St. in Richmond. The nonprofit is planning to sell the 130-bed facility and build a replacement residential facility for disabled adults in Hanover County. (Jack Jacobs photos)

After nearly a century overlooking Byrd Park, a Richmond home for adults with disabilities is preparing for a move to the suburbs.

The Virginia Home is in the early stages of a relocation to Hanover County, a process that will include selling its 130-bed facility at 1101 Hampton St. in Richmond, the nonprofit’s CEO Doug Vaughan said Thursday.

Proceeds from the sale of the Richmond property would go toward a new, larger facility to be built near the intersection of Pole Green and Bell Creek roads in eastern Hanover.

The Hampton Street facility, where The Virginia Home provides nursing and therapy services to residents, dates to the 1930s. While the facility has been expanded twice over the decades, there is no longer enough space on the property for the nonprofit to grow, Vaughan said.

The Richmond facility sits on a nearly 2-acre site occupied by a five- and six-story building fronting Hampton Street, as well as an attached annex on South Meadow Street. The facility, which hadn’t yet been listed for sale, overlooks Swan Lake and Shields Lake at Byrd Park.

The property was most recently assessed at $18.2 million, according to online city land records. The site is zoned single-family residential (R-5).

virginia home 4 scaled

The Virginia Home has operated at 1101 Hampton St., which overlooks Byrd Park, since the 1930s.

In Hanover, The Virginia Home is planning a new 160-bed facility. The nonprofit will need both state regulatory approval for the increased resident capacity as well as a rezoning from the Hanover Board of Supervisors to build the new facility, Vaughan said.

He declined to comment further on the anticipated size or cost of the Hanover project, saying that planning was still underway.

Vaughan also declined to share the exact location of the planned Hanover project, other than to say it would rise on a 71-acre undeveloped site near Pole Green and Bell Creek roads. The nonprofit has the site under contract, and is planning to relocate there around late 2027, he said.

The Virginia Home plans to file an application to the state’s certificate of public need (COPN) program later this month to allow more residents at its planned Hanover facility. In Virginia, certain medical and healthcare facilities and equipment require approval from the state’s health commissioner before they can be established.

The organization, formerly known as The Virginia Home for Incurables, opened its first eight-resident home on the former Ross Street (now Governor Street) in 1894. The organization moved to Hampton Street by 1931, and rebranded to its current name in the 1960s, according to a history on the organization’s website.

In 2022, The Virginia Home reported $30.9 million in revenue and a net income of $8.5 million, according to tax filings. The organization has 240 employees.

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Bob Olsen
Bob Olsen
25 days ago

The old site on Meadow is also where Winder Hospital was located during the Civil War. There is a home on nearby Powhatan street that is a converted hospital building.

David Humphrey
David Humphrey
25 days ago

I wonder if this will jumpstart some redevelopment in that area. I have long held Byrd Park, Maymont, and the Carillon could be our Central Park. It seems the current density of the residential develop surrounding them, with some noted exceptions, is not fully utilizing its acreage and proximity to those amenities.

Bruce D Anderson
Bruce D Anderson
25 days ago
Reply to  David Humphrey

It would be a wonderful place for some really high-end mid-rise condo buildings, but I’m not sure we have developers with that kind of vision here in RVA.

Michael Morgan-Dodson
Michael Morgan-Dodson
25 days ago

I wonder what Mrs Tinsley Greenhow, Mrs. Peterkin, and some of the Robinson-Shields clan think of the move. The current home has been an integral of the Park since its arrived in 1931. We got (since I moved to BP neighborhood in 2001) new (and some improved) handicap access, worked hard to ensure sidewalk from the and around the park were maintained, installed raised planting beds, and got the City to put in the ADA accessible fishing spot on Swann Lake. All of this and more was installed or completed with (and in many case) by the residents of the… Read more »

Daniel Cooper
Daniel Cooper
25 days ago

We have provided maintenance to this building for over 20 years. The people that work here are some of the finest and down to Earth you will ever meet. It takes exceptional people to work in this environment. Working around the tenants in this building has made myself and our employees better people for it. I wish nothing but success for the growth of this non profit.

Brandon King
Brandon King
25 days ago

The location of the new facility is a bit confusing to me. As someone who lived in Byrd Park for years, I know that the residents of the Virginia House really love the neighborhood and being able to travel to the park, Carytown, Maymont, etc.. with limited/no assistance. They chose the complete opposite environment to move to in suburban Hanover. I am sure that there is a lot that went into to the decision but I do wonder how the quality of life of the residents will be affected with some of their agency removed.

Justin Reynolds
Justin Reynolds
25 days ago
Reply to  Brandon King

Brandon, I agree because residents of Virginia Home are in the park a lot and they enjoy the current location. The new location won’t have anything to offer by comparison. I understand needing more rooms for residents and I fully support the mission. However it seems like they’d be better off considering a second location instead of moving everyone 10+ miles away.

Tom Joseph
Tom Joseph
22 days ago
Reply to  Brandon King

Last time I was in Byrd park an urban outdoorsman had set up camp in a picnic shelter. I almost hated to wake him up, but it was lunchtime and I had paid for use of the shelter. I wonder if that has something to do with it?

George MacGuffin
George MacGuffin
24 days ago

Societal decay begins from within. Richmond can’t be wasting that invaluable plot, building, and nearby amenities on the less fortunate!
Why we sell it! Earn some nice bonuses and commissions, have developers convert it to luxury apartments for the 1%, and move out to a barren exurban collector road. But don’t worry, chances are there is a Sheetz nearby, and we all know that prosperity begins at Sheetz.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
24 days ago

What do you mean, or have others mean by societal decay? Non-profits DO need cash, and to spend what money they do have wisely. Do you deny this? Funny that one person on this page is saying that “Our developers don’t have the vision to make a Central Park wall of high end homes around the periphery of the parks, and here we also have you saying that things should be frozen in amber. I say to both of you it will happen, to an extent, whether Richmond’s developers have the vision or not. And it won’t be the 1%… Read more »

George MacGuffin
George MacGuffin
23 days ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

2021 Average Annual Wages
Group Avg. Wages
Top 0.1% of Earners $3,312,693
Top 1% of Earners $819,324
Top 5% of Earners $335,891
Top 10% of Earners $167,639

William Samuels
William Samuels
22 days ago

I doubt these numbers are correct. Average income, probably, but not ‘wages’. Also, there’s a huge difference between average income and median income.

Elaine Hoke
Elaine Hoke
21 days ago

My brother has been a C-3 quadriplegic for 31 years and The Virginia Home is the most incredible facility for people who suffer from spinal cord injuries. I cannot say enough good things about the care and service that is provided to the patients. People have no idea how catastrophic a spinal cord injury is for any family. My brother was on a waiting list for several years before being admitted. I will miss the area when TVH moves.

David Shaw
David Shaw
21 days ago

My Wife and I have two friends at the Virginia Home. Neither one of us drive and depend on a bus to get to and from the facility to visit our friends. If they move to Hanover County, we will have no way to get there. David Shaw Richmond, VA