Tech Review: Firefox tops Google Chrome

chromeChrome is a simple, straightforward browser that offers little more than the bare minimum in terms of web browsing. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Pages load quickly, and the home page is a great concept that should be used in every browser. It keeps track of the pages that you visit most frequently and then displays them through thumbnailed pictures and links.

Google is taking aim at top web browsers like Internet Explorer with its new surfing application called Chrome.

Chrome, which was released on Sept. 2, offers features like tabbed browsing and a nifty home page that shows your most heavily visited sites.

I’ve spent the last week testing out Chrome, as well as Microsoft’s latest release, Internet Explorer 8.

The verdict: Chrome is a simple, straightforward browser that offers little more than the bare minimum in terms of web browsing. And that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Pages load quickly, and the home page is a great concept that should be used in every browser. It keeps track of the pages that you visit most frequently and then displays them through thumbnailed pictures and links.

Internet Explorer 8, which is actually a beta release, offers more extras than Chrome and is a little more aesthetically pleasing. But it’s buggy, and it loaded pages slower than both Chrome and my current favorite browser, Mozilla Firefox.

I kept track of load times for several sites, and in all cases, Chrome outperformed Internet Explorer. However, my trusty Firefox loaded pages faster than both of them, except for a few anomalies. Chrome loaded Google.com and Gmail.com faster than Firefox. Something tells me that’s not a coincidence.

Much of the hype about Internet Explorer 8 revolves around Microsoft’s addition of Accelerators. Take a look at how they work here.
If you’re at a website for a restaurant and find the street address, normally you would have copy and paste it into a search engine in order to get a map or directions. With Accelerators, the middleman is taken out, so you can just click on the street address and bring up a list of options including the ability to map it with Yahoo maps.

It’s a cool concept, and it’s functionally sound. However, it doesn’t save all that much time, and most people surfing the net won’t use them enough to make the technology worthwhile.

With Chrome, you get a simple approach to web browsing. The tabbed browsing feature is nice, but certainly nothing new, as Internet Explorer and Firefox have offered similar services for years now. It’s still a little rough around the edges, but I can see users switching over from Internet Explorer to Chrome, based on the brand power of Google and the simplicity of the product.

Alec Depcrynski reviews new technology for BizSense. Mostly, though, he covers retail, commercial real estate and small business. Please send story ideas to [email protected]

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icokcleld
icokcleld
11 years ago

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