NewsFeeds 8.31.09

Ashland a symbol that small towns, Wal-Mart can co-exist (Times-Dispatch)
Six years after Wal-Mart came to town, Ashland is still Ashland. There’s still a quaint downtown with railroad tracks running down the middle of the main street, and there’s still a bustling business corridor just off Interstate 95.  But nearly a decade ago, the threat of a Wal-Mart moving in and disrupting that charm spurred local debate so heated that it caught national attention and became the subject of a PBS documentary about what happens when the world’s largest retailer moves into a small town.

Tech company claims pair stole secrets (Virginia Gazette)
A Toano technology is suing two ex-employees for $3.5 million, alleging they conspired to steal trade secrets. The suit offers a glimpse into the high-stakes world of technology and corporate espionage.

Wachovia to pay $1.22 million in settlement (Virginina-Pilot)
Virginia’s securities regulators said Wachovia Securities and Wachovia Capital Markets agreed to pay $1.22 million as part of a settlement involving the companies’ sales of debt securities that shortchanged some investors.

Some Buildings Not Living Up to Green Label (NY Times)
Builders covet LEED certification — it stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design — as a way to gain tax credits, attract tenants, charge premium rents and project an image of environmental responsibility. But the gap between design and construction, which LEED certifies, and how some buildings actually perform led the program last week to announce that it would begin collecting information about energy use from all the buildings it certifies.

Three Best Ways to Get Rid of Office Equipment (WSJ)
They are the unattended items that get left behind when employees get laid off: desks, chairs, computer screens, even cars. Small-business owners looking for extra dollars in the budget should turn attention to those unused supplies or equipment gathering dust. You might bring in extra cash, or even trim costs if you’re still carrying insurance or paying them off. Certainly, keep some items in storage if you expect business or hiring to pick back up soon. Otherwise, it’s time to clean house. Here are the three best ways to get rid of office equipment.

How Cloud Computing Can Help Small Businesses (BusinessWeek)
Outsourcing computer applications to providers over the Web gives you flexibility and saves money, too.

Ashland a symbol that small towns, Wal-Mart can co-exist (Times-Dispatch)
Six years after Wal-Mart came to town, Ashland is still Ashland. There’s still a quaint downtown with railroad tracks running down the middle of the main street, and there’s still a bustling business corridor just off Interstate 95.  But nearly a decade ago, the threat of a Wal-Mart moving in and disrupting that charm spurred local debate so heated that it caught national attention and became the subject of a PBS documentary about what happens when the world’s largest retailer moves into a small town.

Tech company claims pair stole secrets (Virginia Gazette)
A Toano technology is suing two ex-employees for $3.5 million, alleging they conspired to steal trade secrets. The suit offers a glimpse into the high-stakes world of technology and corporate espionage.

Wachovia to pay $1.22 million in settlement (Virginina-Pilot)
Virginia’s securities regulators said Wachovia Securities and Wachovia Capital Markets agreed to pay $1.22 million as part of a settlement involving the companies’ sales of debt securities that shortchanged some investors.

Some Buildings Not Living Up to Green Label (NY Times)
Builders covet LEED certification — it stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design — as a way to gain tax credits, attract tenants, charge premium rents and project an image of environmental responsibility. But the gap between design and construction, which LEED certifies, and how some buildings actually perform led the program last week to announce that it would begin collecting information about energy use from all the buildings it certifies.

Three Best Ways to Get Rid of Office Equipment (WSJ)
They are the unattended items that get left behind when employees get laid off: desks, chairs, computer screens, even cars. Small-business owners looking for extra dollars in the budget should turn attention to those unused supplies or equipment gathering dust. You might bring in extra cash, or even trim costs if you’re still carrying insurance or paying them off. Certainly, keep some items in storage if you expect business or hiring to pick back up soon. Otherwise, it’s time to clean house. Here are the three best ways to get rid of office equipment.

How Cloud Computing Can Help Small Businesses (BusinessWeek)
Outsourcing computer applications to providers over the Web gives you flexibility and saves money, too.

Your subscription has expired. Renew now by choosing a subscription below!

For more informaiton, head over to your profile.

Profile


SUBSCRIBE NOW

TERMS OF SERVICE:

ALL MEMBERSHIPS RENEW AUTOMATICALLY. YOU WILL BE CHARGED FOR A 1 YEAR MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL AT THE RATE IN EFFECT AT THAT TIME UNLESS YOU CANCEL YOUR MEMBERSHIP BY LOGGING IN OR BY CONTACTING [email protected]

ALL CHARGES FOR MONTHLY OR ANNUAL MEMBERSHIPS ARE NONREFUNDABLE.

EACH MEMBERSHIP WILL ONLY FUNCTION ON UP TO 3 MACHINES. ACCOUNTS ABUSING THAT LIMIT WILL BE DISCONTINUED.

FOR ASSISTANCE WITH YOUR MEMEBERSHIP PLEASE EMAIL [email protected]




Return to Homepage

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments