NewsFeeds 1.11.10

Joe’s Market to be sold; its name, hours will change (Times-Dispatch)
Joe’s Market should soon have a new name, be open on Sundays and sell beer and wine. The specialty food market in Richmond’s West End has been saved from closing now that two longtime employee of Ukrop’s Super Markets Inc. have reached an agreement to buy the store on Libbie Avenue.

Glass plant shut up to six months (Virginia Gazette)
Owens-Illinois now says it will keep the Toano plant closed for up to six months, an ominous sign. The plant employs around 180 and closed indefinitely the week before Christmas.

Loggers hope for end to wood fuel cap (Roanoke Times)
Senate Bill 39 would remove a cap on the amount of wood products that power companies burn for fuel for “renewable portfolio standard” credits. But the same bill was killed in committee last year and does not have the backing of Covington’s largest employer and taxpayer, MeadWestvaco.

Small companies shed another 25,000 jobs (Fortune)
Small companies shed another 25,000 jobs in December, marking the 23rd consecutive month of cuts, according to a report released Wednesday by payroll-processing firm Automatic Data Processing. The silver lining is that December’s pink slip count was the lowest since July 2008 for small firms, those with 50 or fewer workers. In one sector, the job pool actually grew: Service-oriented small businesses hired a net 11,000 workers in December.

For Many Entrepreneurs, Running the Show is Stressful (WSJ)
It’s clear from numerous interviews of entrepreneurs that the best method of combating business-related stress is to plan. Entrepreneurs who haven’t updated or assembled their business plan (for more on business plans, click here) can feel directionless, inefficient and overwhelmed— all of which contribute to stress. Writing out even a simple plan can prevent overload while also providing a viable road map to success.

Understanding the New American Consumer (BNET)
Nancy Koehn, a Harvard Business School historian with a focus on retail, calls this “the new normal,” the biggest change in consumer attitudes since WW II. Here are the three things that distinguish the American consumer of today from even just two years ago, Koehn says.

Joe’s Market to be sold; its name, hours will change (Times-Dispatch)
Joe’s Market should soon have a new name, be open on Sundays and sell beer and wine. The specialty food market in Richmond’s West End has been saved from closing now that two longtime employee of Ukrop’s Super Markets Inc. have reached an agreement to buy the store on Libbie Avenue.

Glass plant shut up to six months (Virginia Gazette)
Owens-Illinois now says it will keep the Toano plant closed for up to six months, an ominous sign. The plant employs around 180 and closed indefinitely the week before Christmas.

Loggers hope for end to wood fuel cap (Roanoke Times)
Senate Bill 39 would remove a cap on the amount of wood products that power companies burn for fuel for “renewable portfolio standard” credits. But the same bill was killed in committee last year and does not have the backing of Covington’s largest employer and taxpayer, MeadWestvaco.

Small companies shed another 25,000 jobs (Fortune)
Small companies shed another 25,000 jobs in December, marking the 23rd consecutive month of cuts, according to a report released Wednesday by payroll-processing firm Automatic Data Processing. The silver lining is that December’s pink slip count was the lowest since July 2008 for small firms, those with 50 or fewer workers. In one sector, the job pool actually grew: Service-oriented small businesses hired a net 11,000 workers in December.

For Many Entrepreneurs, Running the Show is Stressful (WSJ)
It’s clear from numerous interviews of entrepreneurs that the best method of combating business-related stress is to plan. Entrepreneurs who haven’t updated or assembled their business plan (for more on business plans, click here) can feel directionless, inefficient and overwhelmed— all of which contribute to stress. Writing out even a simple plan can prevent overload while also providing a viable road map to success.

Understanding the New American Consumer (BNET)
Nancy Koehn, a Harvard Business School historian with a focus on retail, calls this “the new normal,” the biggest change in consumer attitudes since WW II. Here are the three things that distinguish the American consumer of today from even just two years ago, Koehn says.

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