Property values decline 6 percent in Chesterfield

This story first ran in the Chesterfield Observer, which is an RBS news partner.

The typical home and commercial property in Chesterfield County declined 6 percent in value last year. Data from 2009 showed that 93 percent of all property declined in value, 4 percent did not change and 3 percent increased in value.

The increases occurred because of additions and remodeling.

According to Jonathan Davis, director of the Chesterfield County Real Estate Assessor’s Office, the property tax rate would have to be raised to $1.01 per $100 of assessed value from its current 95-cent rate if the County wanted to bring in the same amount of revenue as last year.

County and Chesterfield school leaders have been discussing the possibility of a 4-cent hike in the tax rate to be revenue neutral to deal with likely cuts in government and school programs and personnel. A 6-percent decline allows for a higher increase if approved by the board of supervisors.

“Homes priced under $250,000 have been holding their values,” said Davis. “Homes assessed at over $600,000 have seen the biggest declines in values.”

The average price of a new home sold in 2009 – including townhouses and condominiums – declined to $317,042. In 2008, it was $381,280.

New home construction dropped by about one-third last year to $224.9 million from $333.9 million. New commercial and industrial construction also declined. It was $157.4 million in 2009, down from $204.2 million the year before.

Greg Pearson is the publisher of the Chesterfield Observer, where this story first ran.

This story first ran in the Chesterfield Observer, which is an RBS news partner.

The typical home and commercial property in Chesterfield County declined 6 percent in value last year. Data from 2009 showed that 93 percent of all property declined in value, 4 percent did not change and 3 percent increased in value.

The increases occurred because of additions and remodeling.

According to Jonathan Davis, director of the Chesterfield County Real Estate Assessor’s Office, the property tax rate would have to be raised to $1.01 per $100 of assessed value from its current 95-cent rate if the County wanted to bring in the same amount of revenue as last year.

County and Chesterfield school leaders have been discussing the possibility of a 4-cent hike in the tax rate to be revenue neutral to deal with likely cuts in government and school programs and personnel. A 6-percent decline allows for a higher increase if approved by the board of supervisors.

“Homes priced under $250,000 have been holding their values,” said Davis. “Homes assessed at over $600,000 have seen the biggest declines in values.”

The average price of a new home sold in 2009 – including townhouses and condominiums – declined to $317,042. In 2008, it was $381,280.

New home construction dropped by about one-third last year to $224.9 million from $333.9 million. New commercial and industrial construction also declined. It was $157.4 million in 2009, down from $204.2 million the year before.

Greg Pearson is the publisher of the Chesterfield Observer, where this story first ran.

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