NewsFeeds 6.22.10

Small Chesterfield case sparks big discussion on proffers (Times-Dispatch)
Two years ago, developer George Emerson requested a rezoning to add 65 apartments to the 300 already built at his Chester Village Green. After the case was twice being sent back by the Board of Supervisors, the county Planning Commission last week reluctantly recommended denial of the proposal for the third time. The reason? Emerson refuses to pay the county’s $18,966-per-unit cash proffer, a fee paid by developers to offset the impact of new residents on infrastructure, such as schools, roads and parks.

BP oil spill in Gulf hurting seafood sales in Hampton Roads (Virginian-Pilot)
Seafood operations up and down the Virginia coast hook a large part of their business to the fishing industry in the Gulf. Many have suffered a drop in sales since the BP oil spill led to the shutdown of large fishing areas along the coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.

In Law Schools, Grades Go Up, Just Like That (NY Times)
Law schools seem to view higher grades as one way to rescue their students from the tough economic climate — and perhaps more to the point, to protect their own reputations and rankings. Once able to practically guarantee gainful employment to thousands of students every year, the schools are now fielding complaints from more and more unemployed graduates, frequently drowning in student debt.

On the Mark (Slate)
How an early Facebook investor closed one of the most promising deals of all time.

Why Splurging Is Good for Business (Fast Company)
Find $100 in your budget and spend it on something extraordinary today. It may be something that feels silly. It should be something that makes your team smile. And it must be something that feels special — and makes your staff feel special. Because if it doesn’t — or if you just have no idea what that might be — you might have a bigger management problem on your hands.

ESOP plans let founders cash out and employees cash in (Fortune)
For ESOP companies, all the benefits of the plan have to outweigh the hassles of implementing and maintaining it. Most work with an array of ESOP specialists, valuation experts and attorneys to determine whether a stock ownership plan is feasible and then to create one. The process can be daunting.

Small Chesterfield case sparks big discussion on proffers (Times-Dispatch)
Two years ago, developer George Emerson requested a rezoning to add 65 apartments to the 300 already built at his Chester Village Green. After the case was twice being sent back by the Board of Supervisors, the county Planning Commission last week reluctantly recommended denial of the proposal for the third time. The reason? Emerson refuses to pay the county’s $18,966-per-unit cash proffer, a fee paid by developers to offset the impact of new residents on infrastructure, such as schools, roads and parks.

BP oil spill in Gulf hurting seafood sales in Hampton Roads (Virginian-Pilot)
Seafood operations up and down the Virginia coast hook a large part of their business to the fishing industry in the Gulf. Many have suffered a drop in sales since the BP oil spill led to the shutdown of large fishing areas along the coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.

In Law Schools, Grades Go Up, Just Like That (NY Times)
Law schools seem to view higher grades as one way to rescue their students from the tough economic climate — and perhaps more to the point, to protect their own reputations and rankings. Once able to practically guarantee gainful employment to thousands of students every year, the schools are now fielding complaints from more and more unemployed graduates, frequently drowning in student debt.

On the Mark (Slate)
How an early Facebook investor closed one of the most promising deals of all time.

Why Splurging Is Good for Business (Fast Company)
Find $100 in your budget and spend it on something extraordinary today. It may be something that feels silly. It should be something that makes your team smile. And it must be something that feels special — and makes your staff feel special. Because if it doesn’t — or if you just have no idea what that might be — you might have a bigger management problem on your hands.

ESOP plans let founders cash out and employees cash in (Fortune)
For ESOP companies, all the benefits of the plan have to outweigh the hassles of implementing and maintaining it. Most work with an array of ESOP specialists, valuation experts and attorneys to determine whether a stock ownership plan is feasible and then to create one. The process can be daunting.

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