Owner to release reins of River Road estate

Photos courtesy of Motleys.

The 400-acre Chesterfield estate will be sold in its entirety or split into six distinct tracts. Photos courtesy of Motleys.

Another huge local equestrian estate is galloping up to the auction block.

Wayne Campbell, longtime owner of Richmond Respiratory & Medical Supply, is selling his 400-plus-acre Chesterfield farm at 12830 River Road.

Campbell said he decided to sell the farm after his medical supply company’s revenue was hit by changes from the Affordable Care Act and new Medicare regulations.

“I don’t like letting (the farm) go for the reasons we’re letting it go, but it’s probably time for a change,” Campbell, 67, said.

Campbell Springs Farm has been broken into six tracts that can be purchased individually or together. Motleys Asset Disposition Group is handling the auction.

Motleys started accepting bids on Tuesday, and bids can be placed in person on Sept. 9 at the farm.

Tract 1 includes 11.7 acres, two barns, a carriage house, a riding ring and other horse facilities.

The home on the estate is 6,000 square feet and includes a pool.

The home on the estate is 6,000 square feet and includes a pool.

Tract 2 has Campbell’s 6,000-square-foot house, an indoor and outdoor pool and 96.5 acres. Tract 3 includes 20 acres, a 31,250-square-foot indoor riding arena, two barns and an outdoor stadium ring, among other facilities.

Tract 4 is 124 acres and could be used as a site for a private estate. Tract 5 contains about 130 acres of timber. Tract 6 is another potential home site on 2.61 acres.

Campbell said his company has suffered since Medicare patients started having to use certain companies for some medical supplies instead of choosing the company themselves.

He said he’s had to lay off three employees, cut salaries and go without a paycheck himself for six months to keep the business afloat. Campbell has owned Richmond Respiratory & Medical Supply since 1991. The business is located at 1108D Courthouse Road.

Campbell bought the farm property in 1993 and transformed it into an equestrian estate where people can board and ride horses. He also raises redbone coonhounds and Angus cattle.

Campbell Springs Farm can board as many as 74 horses and boarding rates range from $225 to $500 a month per horse. He’s currently boarding about 20 horses. The dogs and cattle will go with Campbell to a new farm he plans to build on a smaller property.

Campbell said the farm is assessed at $2.74 million and has a bank appraisal of more than $3 million. He decided to put the farm up for auction instead of listing it for traditional sale to speed up the process.

“I needed to move now and not six months from now,” he said.

Chip Jones, who is handling the auction for Motleys, said the property would be great for a buyer looking for a private estate, someone who loves horses, a businessperson who may see a way to generate revenue with the property, or even someone who wants to open a rodeo.

“This is almost like a mini state fairground because of the size of it and the versatility,” Jones said. “You literally could have a small county fair over there.”

Campbell is also auctioning off a large assortment of farm and equestrian equipment, furniture, guns and collectibles. More information, including dates and times, for those auctions can be found at motleys.com.

This is at least the second local equestrian estate put to auction this summer. Auction firm Tranzon is currently working out a deal for a 41-acre Mechanicsville farm it put on the block last month.

Photos courtesy of Motleys.

The 400-acre Chesterfield estate will be sold in its entirety or split into six distinct tracts. Photos courtesy of Motleys.

Another huge local equestrian estate is galloping up to the auction block.

Wayne Campbell, longtime owner of Richmond Respiratory & Medical Supply, is selling his 400-plus-acre Chesterfield farm at 12830 River Road.

Campbell said he decided to sell the farm after his medical supply company’s revenue was hit by changes from the Affordable Care Act and new Medicare regulations.

“I don’t like letting (the farm) go for the reasons we’re letting it go, but it’s probably time for a change,” Campbell, 67, said.

Campbell Springs Farm has been broken into six tracts that can be purchased individually or together. Motleys Asset Disposition Group is handling the auction.

Motleys started accepting bids on Tuesday, and bids can be placed in person on Sept. 9 at the farm.

Tract 1 includes 11.7 acres, two barns, a carriage house, a riding ring and other horse facilities.

The home on the estate is 6,000 square feet and includes a pool.

The home on the estate is 6,000 square feet and includes a pool.

Tract 2 has Campbell’s 6,000-square-foot house, an indoor and outdoor pool and 96.5 acres. Tract 3 includes 20 acres, a 31,250-square-foot indoor riding arena, two barns and an outdoor stadium ring, among other facilities.

Tract 4 is 124 acres and could be used as a site for a private estate. Tract 5 contains about 130 acres of timber. Tract 6 is another potential home site on 2.61 acres.

Campbell said his company has suffered since Medicare patients started having to use certain companies for some medical supplies instead of choosing the company themselves.

He said he’s had to lay off three employees, cut salaries and go without a paycheck himself for six months to keep the business afloat. Campbell has owned Richmond Respiratory & Medical Supply since 1991. The business is located at 1108D Courthouse Road.

Campbell bought the farm property in 1993 and transformed it into an equestrian estate where people can board and ride horses. He also raises redbone coonhounds and Angus cattle.

Campbell Springs Farm can board as many as 74 horses and boarding rates range from $225 to $500 a month per horse. He’s currently boarding about 20 horses. The dogs and cattle will go with Campbell to a new farm he plans to build on a smaller property.

Campbell said the farm is assessed at $2.74 million and has a bank appraisal of more than $3 million. He decided to put the farm up for auction instead of listing it for traditional sale to speed up the process.

“I needed to move now and not six months from now,” he said.

Chip Jones, who is handling the auction for Motleys, said the property would be great for a buyer looking for a private estate, someone who loves horses, a businessperson who may see a way to generate revenue with the property, or even someone who wants to open a rodeo.

“This is almost like a mini state fairground because of the size of it and the versatility,” Jones said. “You literally could have a small county fair over there.”

Campbell is also auctioning off a large assortment of farm and equestrian equipment, furniture, guns and collectibles. More information, including dates and times, for those auctions can be found at motleys.com.

This is at least the second local equestrian estate put to auction this summer. Auction firm Tranzon is currently working out a deal for a 41-acre Mechanicsville farm it put on the block last month.

Your subscription has expired. Renew now by choosing a subscription below!

For more informaiton, head over to your profile.

Profile


SUBSCRIBE NOW

TERMS OF SERVICE:

ALL MEMBERSHIPS RENEW AUTOMATICALLY. YOU WILL BE CHARGED FOR A 1 YEAR MEMBERSHIP RENEWAL AT THE RATE IN EFFECT AT THAT TIME UNLESS YOU CANCEL YOUR MEMBERSHIP BY LOGGING IN OR BY CONTACTING [email protected]

ALL CHARGES FOR MONTHLY OR ANNUAL MEMBERSHIPS ARE NONREFUNDABLE.

EACH MEMBERSHIP WILL ONLY FUNCTION ON UP TO 3 MACHINES. ACCOUNTS ABUSING THAT LIMIT WILL BE DISCONTINUED.




Return to Homepage

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
7 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Eugene Golden
Eugene Golden
7 years ago

I do not think the owner is hurting to much. He may have to downsize to a 5000 square foot home. Blaming it on the PPACA is just a bunch of political crap. he loses his inside and outside heated pool so the most needy can have adequate healthcare. At 67 he should be retiring anyway. I guess that closer government scrutiny under The PPACA makes it harder to over charge in his medical supply business. They are watching what is being charged now so maybe he figured it was time to run and hide . I am not saying… Read more »

LJ Ball
LJ Ball
7 years ago
Reply to  Eugene Golden

Eugene and Angela, you two should be ashamed of yourselves. First of all, you show a very limited understanding of who, exactly, this law affects. If you think “sticking it to the rich” (read: more successful than you due to wise decision-making skills) makes anybody’s lives better, you have another “think” coming. To tongue-lash and relegate a healthy, vibrant, ambitious fellow at a perfectly fine working age of 67 to retirement is despicable as you don’t know his situation. Seems liberalism creates a whole lot of needless class warfare and mean-spiritedness after all. And, as for blaming the president–for that,… Read more »

Mari Mackey
Mari Mackey
7 years ago
Reply to  LJ Ball

LJ, thank you for your thoughtful reply. It is unfortunate that there is ignorance in the community that assume the “rich” arrived at their “wealth” by chance. I know the owner is a tireless hard working man who made very good business decisions and lived a comfortable life not an extravagant one. I reward him for his courage to sell his home and property that he consciously grew to a fine equestrian business; the decision must have been heart retching. I would encourage other opinions to be based on fact and be presented in a professional way. Please cut out… Read more »

Angela Blount
Angela Blount
7 years ago

Mr. Eugene Golden, thank you for your comments. You wrote what I was thinking as I read the article. It seems our President is to blame for everything that goes wrong in a person’s life.

Carol Quiggle
Carol Quiggle
7 years ago

Typical liberal logic: they do not care the consequences of their policies, as long as they meant well. So a great many doctors retire. So what? So there is less health care available to a larger pool of patients. So what? So tax receipts are lower because of all those rich people who have quit working because it doesn’t pay to work anymore. So what. So all the employees are out of jobs. So what? So the economy takes even longer to recover, hurting everyone. So what? As long as you meant well, that is all that is important.

William Catto
William Catto
7 years ago

Oversize, crappy-looking house looks like it was designed by amateurs, or perhaps by no one at all.

Josie Rollins
Josie Rollins
7 years ago

To be that comments are moderated, and censored on this site, there seems to be a lot of envious folks compelled to share their negativity.

Starting, operating, and growing a business is not easy. And it’s always further complicated when macro policies are involved in your sector.