Hallsley slated for 60-acre addition

A new stretch of land could soon be added to the Hallsley development. Image via Chesterfield County planning staff report.

A new stretch of land could soon be added to the Hallsley development. Image via Chesterfield County planning staff report.

A massive Midlothian development is eyeing a new section of homes.

The developers of the 650-acre Hallsley community are looking to add as many as 65 homes on 56 acres to the west of Old Hundred Road, between Brightwalton and Mt. Hermon roads.

A required rezoning for the addition received endorsement from the Chesterfield County Planning Commission last month. The request now goes to county supervisors for approval Aug. 26.

Hallsley developer East West Communities is seeking the rezoning through its East West Hallsley LLC. The Midlothian-based developer behind the nearly 2,500-acre Brandermill community purchased Hallsley in 2013 from Land First LLC and Hallsboro Development Corp. The original developers were brothers Buddy and Mark Sowers.

Daniel Jones, project manager for East West Communities, could not be reached for comment on the 65-home addition, which is planned to consist of home styles compatible with those built thus far throughout Hallsley. Homes are to have a minimum floor area of 2,000 square feet, according to a county staff report.

The developer is agreeing to pay cash proffers to the county of just less than $19,000 per home to help offset impacts on public infrastructure, such as schools, roads, parks, libraries and fire stations.

Approval would also require East West to construct several road improvements: a 90-foot-wide east-west arterial road called Baybon Road that would run the width of the site, and additional turn lanes along Baybon at each intersection with an access road and along Brightwalton Road at its intersection with Baybon.

East West has worked with multiple builders on homes in other sections of Hallsley so far. Home styles have included Georgian, Greek Revival, classic revival, colonial, Queen Anne, Tudor and Craftsman.

The developer is working with landscape architecture firm Balzer & Associates on this latest proposed section.

Meanwhile, one of Hallsley’s original developers, Mark Sowers, is proposing his own 50-acre subdivision farther to the north. That proposal, for 30 to 40 1-acre home sites near Huguenot Springs Road, likewise received the Planning Commission’s endorsement.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
5 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Cole Gardner
Cole Gardner
5 years ago

The image map at the top incorrectly shows Midlothian Turnpike as Hull Street Road

Stefan Brooks
Stefan Brooks
5 years ago

Not Midlothian Turnpike or Hull Street, but actually Mt. Hermon Road.

Mika Hakkinen
Mika Hakkinen
5 years ago

Developers continue to gobble up the countryside, building hundreds of new homes, while complaining that proffers are cutting into their profits too much. Doesn’t wash, does it….

Each new home dilutes the value of existing real estate just a little…

Ike Mazzard
Ike Mazzard
5 years ago
Reply to  Mika Hakkinen

Know what doesn’t hurt homebuilder profits? The subcontractors who further subcontract teams of uninsured and more often than not, undocumented throw-away workers. They work for peanuts 7 days a week and the subcontracting scheme conveniently allows for plausible deniability.

Ike Mazzard
Ike Mazzard
5 years ago

JB Watkins elementary is already 130% over capacity, yet the county keeps sprawling ahead. I bet “Sprallsley” does not advertise deteriorating schools. Chesterfield is beholden to developers, but unlike Henrico county which is also committed to sprawl, they do not plan ahead or correct the strain on county provided services. East West hasn’t had an original idea in 40 years. Cul-de-sacs, trails, pool all serviced by strip-malls off a collector road. This is not smart growth. It’s antiquated stupid growth that only fills the pockets of greedy homebuilders.