Dodson partners with yoga studio in downtown building

Joseph Freeman II, Duke Dodson and Natasha Foreman plan to redevelop 300 E. Grace St. (J. Elias O'Neal)

Joseph Freeman II, Duke Dodson and Natasha Foreman plan to redevelop 300 E. Grace St. (J. Elias O’Neal)

A yoga teacher and a busy local real estate developer have come together in the latest effort to reinvigorate the downtown stretch of East Grace Street.

Natasha Foreman, with her father, Joseph Freeman II, and Duke Dodson of Dodson Property Management, last month purchased a three-story building at 300 E. Grace St. for $343,000.

The 5,000-square-foot property was built in the 1920s and is surrounded by new restaurants, a brewery and rehabbed mixed-use buildings. It will become home to offices for Natasha Foreman’s Lucid Punk Apparel, a studio and tea bar for her Lucid Living yoga and health center, and three apartments on the upper floors.

Foreman’s brand Lucid Living offers services like Thai body work, yoga and Reiki, a form of hands-on therapy, while Lucid Punk Apparel focuses on clothing with positive messaging.

“I travel to different locations to conduct yoga classes, and pretty much run Lucid Punk Apparel from wherever,” Foreman said. “Now, I have a place where I can do so much more, and provide the type of space that I need to offer my services and grow my brand.”

Foreman is set to open in March 2018.

A military brat in her youth, Foreman has traveled the world with her family, including tours in Texas and Germany. She was born in Richmond, attended Tucker High School in Henrico County, and graduated from Virginia Tech in 2005.

A rendering of the planned lobby for Lucid Punk Apparel and a yoga studio and tea bar. (Courtesy Campfire & Co.)

A rendering of the planned lobby for Lucid Punk Apparel and a yoga studio and tea bar. (Courtesy Campfire & Co.)

“I just love the city,” she said. “The people are welcoming … there’s an energy about this city that just draws you in.”

Before returning to Richmond, Foreman worked in commercial real estate and small-business consulting in Washington, D.C. She said the long hours and work-related stress drove her to yoga and other relaxation practices.

“It saved my life, because I learned to be able to take control of my life,” Foreman said. “I felt that was something I wanted to share with others.”

Foreman stopped doing small-business consulting at the end of last year to focus on her Lucid brands while teaching yoga across the city.

Foreman worked with Dodson Property Management, and when she shared her idea with Dodson, he helped find the downtown space and signed on as a partner.

“All the pieces really came together,” Foreman said.

Construction company Urban Core is handling renovations of the building. Campfire & Co. was tapped to update Lucid’s branding and complete the interior design.

Foreman said First Community Bank is financing the project, which is the latest in a recent string of new arrivals to the neighborhood.

Across Third Street, new tenants continue moving into the Deco at CNB building – the 23-story, 240,000-square-foot Central National Bank tower that was converted into 200 apartments by Washington, D.C.-based Douglas Development.

Charlottesville-based Champion Brewing Co. recently opened a taproom at 401 E. Grace St. Secret Sandwich Society restaurant opened last year a block over at 501 E. Grace St.

An $86 million, 18-story tower has been proposed for city-owned property at Sixth and Grace streets, though City Council on Monday deferred action on the plan.

Joseph Freeman II, Duke Dodson and Natasha Foreman plan to redevelop 300 E. Grace St. (J. Elias O'Neal)

Joseph Freeman II, Duke Dodson and Natasha Foreman plan to redevelop 300 E. Grace St. (J. Elias O’Neal)

A yoga teacher and a busy local real estate developer have come together in the latest effort to reinvigorate the downtown stretch of East Grace Street.

Natasha Foreman, with her father, Joseph Freeman II, and Duke Dodson of Dodson Property Management, last month purchased a three-story building at 300 E. Grace St. for $343,000.

The 5,000-square-foot property was built in the 1920s and is surrounded by new restaurants, a brewery and rehabbed mixed-use buildings. It will become home to offices for Natasha Foreman’s Lucid Punk Apparel, a studio and tea bar for her Lucid Living yoga and health center, and three apartments on the upper floors.

Foreman’s brand Lucid Living offers services like Thai body work, yoga and Reiki, a form of hands-on therapy, while Lucid Punk Apparel focuses on clothing with positive messaging.

“I travel to different locations to conduct yoga classes, and pretty much run Lucid Punk Apparel from wherever,” Foreman said. “Now, I have a place where I can do so much more, and provide the type of space that I need to offer my services and grow my brand.”

Foreman is set to open in March 2018.

A military brat in her youth, Foreman has traveled the world with her family, including tours in Texas and Germany. She was born in Richmond, attended Tucker High School in Henrico County, and graduated from Virginia Tech in 2005.

A rendering of the planned lobby for Lucid Punk Apparel and a yoga studio and tea bar. (Courtesy Campfire & Co.)

A rendering of the planned lobby for Lucid Punk Apparel and a yoga studio and tea bar. (Courtesy Campfire & Co.)

“I just love the city,” she said. “The people are welcoming … there’s an energy about this city that just draws you in.”

Before returning to Richmond, Foreman worked in commercial real estate and small-business consulting in Washington, D.C. She said the long hours and work-related stress drove her to yoga and other relaxation practices.

“It saved my life, because I learned to be able to take control of my life,” Foreman said. “I felt that was something I wanted to share with others.”

Foreman stopped doing small-business consulting at the end of last year to focus on her Lucid brands while teaching yoga across the city.

Foreman worked with Dodson Property Management, and when she shared her idea with Dodson, he helped find the downtown space and signed on as a partner.

“All the pieces really came together,” Foreman said.

Construction company Urban Core is handling renovations of the building. Campfire & Co. was tapped to update Lucid’s branding and complete the interior design.

Foreman said First Community Bank is financing the project, which is the latest in a recent string of new arrivals to the neighborhood.

Across Third Street, new tenants continue moving into the Deco at CNB building – the 23-story, 240,000-square-foot Central National Bank tower that was converted into 200 apartments by Washington, D.C.-based Douglas Development.

Charlottesville-based Champion Brewing Co. recently opened a taproom at 401 E. Grace St. Secret Sandwich Society restaurant opened last year a block over at 501 E. Grace St.

An $86 million, 18-story tower has been proposed for city-owned property at Sixth and Grace streets, though City Council on Monday deferred action on the plan.

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