Nonprofit trades historic W. Franklin home for the Fan

Junior League of Richmond plans to sell its historic house at 205 W. Franklin St. (Mike Platania)

With its home of more than 40 years under contract to be sold, a local nonprofit is leaving Monroe Ward for the Fan.

Junior League of Richmond is preparing to move its office to 2605 W. Cary St. at the end of the month. The organization, made up of women who promote volunteerism, youth development and community action in Richmond, has been based out of the Mayo-Carter House at 205 W. Franklin St. since 1977.

The Mayo-Carter House was built in the late 1800s as a private residence and designed by the same architecture firm that designed the Jefferson Hotel.

President Sue Patow said the cost of maintaining the house played a factor in the decision to sell.

“She’s a wonderful old house and we love her dearly but it’s expensive to maintain,” Patow said. “The money that we raise to enable us to serve the community is better used there than used on the house.”

Metro Properties, a local real estate firm that manages dozens of residential properties throughout the Fan, Museum District and VCU areas, is under contract to buy the house.

The Mayo-Carter House’s selling price was not disclosed. A city assessment most recently valued the property at $152,000, though Patow said the house is split between a taxable parcel and a tax-exempt parcel.

While the city’s online property record shows only the taxable parcel that is assessed at $152,000, Patow said the nonprofit had a private appraisal done by local firm Knight, Dorin & Rountrey that assessed the tax-exempt parcel at $900,000.

The sale is expected to close May 31, the same time Junior League will move to its new digs in the Fan, in the former Bohland & Graham antiques store space near the intersection of West Cary and South Robinson streets.

The nonprofit will move to a new office in the Fan. (Mike Platania)

The building is a 2,800-square-foot blank shell, with Courtney Ludeman Interiors as designer and general contractor for the buildout.

Junior League has a staff of four that will be based out of the new office, and Patow said it will be much more functional for its 900-plus members.

“The Mayo-Carter was not accessible to everyone, we had a staircase of about 25 steps in the front and back,” she said.

“The new one is flat from the front and back. It speaks more to our mission to diversity and inclusion.”

Patow said much of Junior League’s work has been in the city’s East End, where it serves disadvantaged families, women and children, and works with other nonprofits such as the Friends Association for Children and Peter Paul Development Center.

Proceeds from the sale of the Mayo-Carter House will be reinvested back into Junior League, and the nonprofit is establishing a committee to explore how best to use the funds.

Established in 1926, Junior League of Richmond reported $1.6 million in revenue for 2017, according to nonprofit database GuideStar.

Note: This story has been updated to clarify the property is split between a taxable parcel and a tax-exempt parcel, affecting the assessed value reflected in the city property record.

Junior League of Richmond plans to sell its historic house at 205 W. Franklin St. (Mike Platania)

With its home of more than 40 years under contract to be sold, a local nonprofit is leaving Monroe Ward for the Fan.

Junior League of Richmond is preparing to move its office to 2605 W. Cary St. at the end of the month. The organization, made up of women who promote volunteerism, youth development and community action in Richmond, has been based out of the Mayo-Carter House at 205 W. Franklin St. since 1977.

The Mayo-Carter House was built in the late 1800s as a private residence and designed by the same architecture firm that designed the Jefferson Hotel.

President Sue Patow said the cost of maintaining the house played a factor in the decision to sell.

“She’s a wonderful old house and we love her dearly but it’s expensive to maintain,” Patow said. “The money that we raise to enable us to serve the community is better used there than used on the house.”

Metro Properties, a local real estate firm that manages dozens of residential properties throughout the Fan, Museum District and VCU areas, is under contract to buy the house.

The Mayo-Carter House’s selling price was not disclosed. A city assessment most recently valued the property at $152,000, though Patow said the house is split between a taxable parcel and a tax-exempt parcel.

While the city’s online property record shows only the taxable parcel that is assessed at $152,000, Patow said the nonprofit had a private appraisal done by local firm Knight, Dorin & Rountrey that assessed the tax-exempt parcel at $900,000.

The sale is expected to close May 31, the same time Junior League will move to its new digs in the Fan, in the former Bohland & Graham antiques store space near the intersection of West Cary and South Robinson streets.

The nonprofit will move to a new office in the Fan. (Mike Platania)

The building is a 2,800-square-foot blank shell, with Courtney Ludeman Interiors as designer and general contractor for the buildout.

Junior League has a staff of four that will be based out of the new office, and Patow said it will be much more functional for its 900-plus members.

“The Mayo-Carter was not accessible to everyone, we had a staircase of about 25 steps in the front and back,” she said.

“The new one is flat from the front and back. It speaks more to our mission to diversity and inclusion.”

Patow said much of Junior League’s work has been in the city’s East End, where it serves disadvantaged families, women and children, and works with other nonprofits such as the Friends Association for Children and Peter Paul Development Center.

Proceeds from the sale of the Mayo-Carter House will be reinvested back into Junior League, and the nonprofit is establishing a committee to explore how best to use the funds.

Established in 1926, Junior League of Richmond reported $1.6 million in revenue for 2017, according to nonprofit database GuideStar.

Note: This story has been updated to clarify the property is split between a taxable parcel and a tax-exempt parcel, affecting the assessed value reflected in the city property record.

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Ann Michele Sweeney
Ann Michele Sweeney
4 years ago

Knight, Dorin & Rountrey’s appraisal of $900,000 was for the entire property- both tax-exempt and taxable parcels. Thank you- Ann Michele Sweeney, JLR Controller