Carangelo no longer city building commissioner, replacement named

Jason Carangelo served as Richmond’s building commissioner since the summer of 2019. His last day with the city was Friday. (BizSense file photos)

Richmond’s building commissioner of two years is no longer on the city’s payroll.

Jason Carangelo, who was hired as building commissioner in the summer of 2019, parted ways with the city Friday, Mayor Levar Stoney’s office confirmed Monday.

It was not clear whether Carangelo was dismissed or resigned. BizSense’s request for a resignation letter from Carangelo was not fulfilled by Stoney’s office.

Just after 9 p.m. Friday, Stoney’s office announced the appointment of David Alley III as acting commissioner. The announcement did not mention Carangelo or explain why Alley’s appointment was being made.

Alley was most recently program and operations manager for inspections in the city’s permits and inspections bureau, which Carangelo oversaw. Alley has worked for the city since 2002 and has 38 years of experience in building and construction, according to the announcement.

He holds state certifications as a building official, commercial inspector, property maintenance inspector and Uniform Statewide Building Code technical assistant.

Alley will oversee administration of the bureau, which also covers property maintenance and code enforcement. His annual salary will increase from $85,000 for his previous role to $125,000 as acting commissioner. Carangelo’s salary was $124,000, the mayor’s office confirmed.

The building permits and zoning center at City Hall.

Friday’s announcement states the bureau’s workload has significantly increased in recent years along with development interest and investment in the city, “placing a premium on timely and efficient permitting, plan review, building and code enforcement inspections.”

The announcement includes comments from Stoney and Kevin Vonck, acting director of the Department of Planning, Development and Review, which includes the permits and inspections bureau. Vonck was named acting PDR director in January upon the resignation of previous director Mark Olinger.

“David has the private and public sector experience that is essential to meeting the challenges and demands of managing a building division in a rapidly growing city,” Stoney said in the announcement. “I look forward to his leadership in this new role at this important time.”

Carangelo was brought on to lead the bureau after the city parted ways with his predecessor, Doug Murrow, who had served in the role for seven years. Carangelo previously worked 13 years in a similar role with the City of Savannah in Georgia.

In his two years in Richmond, Carangelo led the creation of a third-party inspection policy, meant to allow applicants to hire private inspectors or firms to conduct inspections and plan reviews if city staff could not do so within 48 hours of a request.

In spring 2020, Carangelo quelled talk in and around City Hall that he was taking a job in another state, telling BizSense at the time via email, “I enjoy my position with the City and have no plans to leave.”

Carangelo could not be reached for comment Monday.

Jason Carangelo served as Richmond’s building commissioner since the summer of 2019. His last day with the city was Friday. (BizSense file photos)

Richmond’s building commissioner of two years is no longer on the city’s payroll.

Jason Carangelo, who was hired as building commissioner in the summer of 2019, parted ways with the city Friday, Mayor Levar Stoney’s office confirmed Monday.

It was not clear whether Carangelo was dismissed or resigned. BizSense’s request for a resignation letter from Carangelo was not fulfilled by Stoney’s office.

Just after 9 p.m. Friday, Stoney’s office announced the appointment of David Alley III as acting commissioner. The announcement did not mention Carangelo or explain why Alley’s appointment was being made.

Alley was most recently program and operations manager for inspections in the city’s permits and inspections bureau, which Carangelo oversaw. Alley has worked for the city since 2002 and has 38 years of experience in building and construction, according to the announcement.

He holds state certifications as a building official, commercial inspector, property maintenance inspector and Uniform Statewide Building Code technical assistant.

Alley will oversee administration of the bureau, which also covers property maintenance and code enforcement. His annual salary will increase from $85,000 for his previous role to $125,000 as acting commissioner. Carangelo’s salary was $124,000, the mayor’s office confirmed.

The building permits and zoning center at City Hall.

Friday’s announcement states the bureau’s workload has significantly increased in recent years along with development interest and investment in the city, “placing a premium on timely and efficient permitting, plan review, building and code enforcement inspections.”

The announcement includes comments from Stoney and Kevin Vonck, acting director of the Department of Planning, Development and Review, which includes the permits and inspections bureau. Vonck was named acting PDR director in January upon the resignation of previous director Mark Olinger.

“David has the private and public sector experience that is essential to meeting the challenges and demands of managing a building division in a rapidly growing city,” Stoney said in the announcement. “I look forward to his leadership in this new role at this important time.”

Carangelo was brought on to lead the bureau after the city parted ways with his predecessor, Doug Murrow, who had served in the role for seven years. Carangelo previously worked 13 years in a similar role with the City of Savannah in Georgia.

In his two years in Richmond, Carangelo led the creation of a third-party inspection policy, meant to allow applicants to hire private inspectors or firms to conduct inspections and plan reviews if city staff could not do so within 48 hours of a request.

In spring 2020, Carangelo quelled talk in and around City Hall that he was taking a job in another state, telling BizSense at the time via email, “I enjoy my position with the City and have no plans to leave.”

Carangelo could not be reached for comment Monday.

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Bill Pangburn
Bill Pangburn
9 months ago

I have known Dave Alley for nearly 20 years. I am a general contractor in the City and not only did Dave inspect my work but he also offered solid advice and guidance when we had code issued questions. Great gentleman to work with. I will truly miss having him inspecting my projects. Congratulations and all the best to a swell guy.

Michael Dodson
Michael Dodson
9 months ago

His accomplishment was a policy that allows 3rd party inspections something allowed by state law and in use in many localities (especially when new projects outpace the ability/time or the tech experience of the staff) to do a review; a policy memo is all the improvements you all could find? And no saying there is more to report either. No improvements in wait time, permit review, inspection scheduling?? City Hall used to have physical revolving door on 9th Street; they might want to bring that back. Best of luck to Dave; he is a down the earth local guy with… Read more »