With pedestrians in mind, CCV acquires home at St. Andrews and Three Chopt

Country Club of Virginia’s Westhampton campus at 6031 Saint Andrews Lane. (Michael Schwartz photos)

Country Club of Virginia has a new addition to the grounds of its Westhampton campus: the home at 6000 Saint Andrews Lane.

The private club earlier this summer paid $1.1 million to purchase the 4,700-square-foot house and its half-acre lot at the intersection of Saint Andrews and Three Chopt Road, across from the terminus of Grove Avenue and across from the club.

In a letter sent to members following the sale, the club said one of the main drivers of the purchase was to help create a safer passage for its staff, many of whom park at St. Stephens Church across the street, and the dozens of younger members who are students at nearby St. Catherine’s and St. Christopher’s and walk to the club at the end of the school day.

In the member letter, the club said the deal was not part of a broader plan to expand its acreage via acquisition. The Westhampton grounds total approximately 120 acres.

“The acquisition of the property was opportunistic and not the product of a strategy of the club to acquire property near the club,” the letter stated. “Property in our neighborhood where the land, rather than the improvements to the land, constitute the biggest portion of its value is a rare find. On behalf of our membership, it was simply an opportunity that the club could not let pass.”

The club told members it has near-term plans to remove plants from the property that obscure sightlines on the southbound lane of Three Chopt and those at the corner of Saint Andrews that inhibited the use of parts of the sidewalk.

Traffic on Three Chopt Road runs on the right of the home at 6000 Saint Andrews Lane.

It also plans to engage the city about potentially widening the sidewalk on Three Chopt.

Other uses for the property are possible in the future, but there’s been nothing concrete proposed.

“The club has a range of ideas for how we may use the property, but all thoughts are preliminary and no options have been studied in depth,” the letter stated. “We have engaged a team of professionals to analyze and prepare conceptual designs for further study.”

In a subsequent interview with BizSense, CCV General Manager Phil Keister reiterated the pedestrian issues that led to the purchase, which was approved by the club’s board.

“I am not an alarmist when it comes to traffic but that is a very dangerous intersection,” Keister said. “Every day, I’d bet 50-100 students cross there and we’re very mindful of the danger of that intersection.”

He also pointed to the fact that other parties will need to be involved to fully eliminate the dangers the club sees at that intersection.

“Frankly, we’re going to need to pursue some partnership with the city, schools and churches,” Keister said. “The club is committed to being a good neighbor and working in partnership with people who own property nearby and the city and institutions to make the intersection safer and an attractive gateway to the club and the neighborhood.”

The property was listed for sale in April at $1.2 million. It was most recently assessed at $924,000. It last sold in 2017 for $800,000.

Country Club of Virginia’s Westhampton campus at 6031 Saint Andrews Lane. (Michael Schwartz photos)

Country Club of Virginia has a new addition to the grounds of its Westhampton campus: the home at 6000 Saint Andrews Lane.

The private club earlier this summer paid $1.1 million to purchase the 4,700-square-foot house and its half-acre lot at the intersection of Saint Andrews and Three Chopt Road, across from the terminus of Grove Avenue and across from the club.

In a letter sent to members following the sale, the club said one of the main drivers of the purchase was to help create a safer passage for its staff, many of whom park at St. Stephens Church across the street, and the dozens of younger members who are students at nearby St. Catherine’s and St. Christopher’s and walk to the club at the end of the school day.

In the member letter, the club said the deal was not part of a broader plan to expand its acreage via acquisition. The Westhampton grounds total approximately 120 acres.

“The acquisition of the property was opportunistic and not the product of a strategy of the club to acquire property near the club,” the letter stated. “Property in our neighborhood where the land, rather than the improvements to the land, constitute the biggest portion of its value is a rare find. On behalf of our membership, it was simply an opportunity that the club could not let pass.”

The club told members it has near-term plans to remove plants from the property that obscure sightlines on the southbound lane of Three Chopt and those at the corner of Saint Andrews that inhibited the use of parts of the sidewalk.

Traffic on Three Chopt Road runs on the right of the home at 6000 Saint Andrews Lane.

It also plans to engage the city about potentially widening the sidewalk on Three Chopt.

Other uses for the property are possible in the future, but there’s been nothing concrete proposed.

“The club has a range of ideas for how we may use the property, but all thoughts are preliminary and no options have been studied in depth,” the letter stated. “We have engaged a team of professionals to analyze and prepare conceptual designs for further study.”

In a subsequent interview with BizSense, CCV General Manager Phil Keister reiterated the pedestrian issues that led to the purchase, which was approved by the club’s board.

“I am not an alarmist when it comes to traffic but that is a very dangerous intersection,” Keister said. “Every day, I’d bet 50-100 students cross there and we’re very mindful of the danger of that intersection.”

He also pointed to the fact that other parties will need to be involved to fully eliminate the dangers the club sees at that intersection.

“Frankly, we’re going to need to pursue some partnership with the city, schools and churches,” Keister said. “The club is committed to being a good neighbor and working in partnership with people who own property nearby and the city and institutions to make the intersection safer and an attractive gateway to the club and the neighborhood.”

The property was listed for sale in April at $1.2 million. It was most recently assessed at $924,000. It last sold in 2017 for $800,000.

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Justin Reynolds
Justin Reynolds
2 months ago

I’m supportive of most anything that improves pedestrian access throughout the city because we are far too car friendly as a region. However, I’ve looked at Google Street View and I don’t really understand how this helps at that intersection. I’ll trust their vision because I like their stated goal.

Frank Ameherst
Frank Ameherst
2 months ago

I love how CCV only mentions concern about safe access to their ‘private’ club from the nearby Protestant church and schools ignoring walkers from the large Catholic church and school on the same corner that may be passing by their prestigious club

Polgar Concertado
Polgar Concertado
2 months ago
Reply to  Frank Ameherst

Frank – if you’re crossing that intersection going south, CCV is basically your only destination. There might be 20 homes along St. Andrews Lane, and it is a dead end. There are plenty of more important things to get your feathers ruffled over.

Dr. Abe C. Gomez
Dr. Abe C. Gomez
2 months ago
Reply to  Frank Ameherst

You’re thinking beyond the article. Stay in the present.

Justin Fritch
Justin Fritch
2 months ago
Reply to  Frank Ameherst

Regardless of how the statement to their shareholders reads, their stated goals would help all of your mentioned outside parties.

Carl Schwendeman
Carl Schwendeman
2 months ago

The sidewalk next to this house is one of the dumbest sidewalks in the city it’s 50 long and a foot wide. It is also blocked by a pedestrian crossing sign. I think the city has been really lazy and secretive about improving the sidewalks in this part of the city.

Ed Christina
Ed Christina
2 months ago

How is a private club that is exclusively for millionaires a tax free non profit?
I’m sure they follow the letter of the law, because the wealthy wrote the laws, but that needs to change.
Also, I find it funny that all the people who complain about VCU not paying taxes don’t bat an eye when the “charity” that is CCV takes up more space.

Matt Merica
Matt Merica
2 months ago

Laughable article. Seriously, it is smarter to pay $1.1 than actually get some traffic/pedestrian framework put up?!? My favorite part: “The club has a range of ideas for how we may use the property, but all thoughts are preliminary and no options have been studied in depth”  A bunch of multi-multi millionaires in the membership and Board approved a $1.1M investment with no real plans for its use? I haven’t laughed that hard since CBS 6 Richmond told its viewers not to shovel the side walks after a snow storm because you would have a heart attack. Let’s see if… Read more »

Fred Squire
Fred Squire
2 months ago
Reply to  Matt Merica

It’s for the children!!!