Project Snapshot: First leg of Eagle’s Foushee Mews is complete

foushee mews facade

The first six townhomes of the project face East Main Street. (Photos courtesy Eagle Construction of VA)

The first phase of a Monroe Ward project that’s replacing one of the neighborhood’s many surface parking lots is ready for residents. 

Eagle Construction of VA recently completed construction on the initial leg of Foushee Mews, a townhouse development spanning roughly half a city block at East Main and Cary streets’ near South Foushee Street. 

Phase one consists of six townhomes from 1-11 E. Main St. They’ll soon be joined by 15 additional units for a total of 21. Site work on the next phase is underway.

Courtney Turner, Eagle’s special projects manager, said the next building to rise will be four-stories in the center of the development. 

foushee mews phase 2

Site work on Foushee Mews’ second phase is visible from the first units’ outdoor terraces.

Foushee Mews has been in the works since 2019 and is rising on a roughly 1-acre plot that had been a parking lot. 

From April 2021 to December 2022, Eagle gradually acquired the land it needed for the project for about $2 million. The only parcels the Henrico-based builder didn’t acquire are a pair of two-story homes on the western end of the 11-13 S. Foushee St. block. 

Nathan Blinn, Eagle’s VP of construction, designed the buildings and said a lot of care and thought went into the design of the Georgian-style townhomes.

“The goal of the design was to compliment and take hints from the local vernacular,” Blinn said. “Our commitment to staying true to Richmond’s architectural history can be seen in the dentil molding on the exterior – each piece was measured out and placed by hand for consistency to fit in with the historic charm.”

foushee mews interior

Foushee Mews’ units will range from 2,400 to 3,500 square feet.

Amenities at Foushee Mews include two-car garages and outdoor terraces. The 2,400-square-foot units feature three bedrooms and 3.5 baths, and the 3,500-square-foot units feature four bedrooms and 4.5 baths. 

Of the six completed units, Turner said three are move-in ready, two are built up to the drywall stage to accommodate buyer customization of things like flooring, cabinets and countertops, and one unit has been sold, however that sale is not reflected in the city’s property records. 

The townhomes are priced from $810,000 to $875,000 and are being marketed by Eagle in-house. 

Eagle also is staying busy south of the river, as Turner said the company recently began the sales process for the final 14 units at McRae & Lacy, a waterfront townhome project at 401 W. Seventh St. in Manchester. 

Correction: Eagle is marketing the townhomes in-house. An earlier version of the story named a real estate sales team that Eagle said is not selling the homes. Courtney Turner’s name also has been corrected in the story.

foushee mews facade

The first six townhomes of the project face East Main Street. (Photos courtesy Eagle Construction of VA)

The first phase of a Monroe Ward project that’s replacing one of the neighborhood’s many surface parking lots is ready for residents. 

Eagle Construction of VA recently completed construction on the initial leg of Foushee Mews, a townhouse development spanning roughly half a city block at East Main and Cary streets’ near South Foushee Street. 

Phase one consists of six townhomes from 1-11 E. Main St. They’ll soon be joined by 15 additional units for a total of 21. Site work on the next phase is underway.

Courtney Turner, Eagle’s special projects manager, said the next building to rise will be four-stories in the center of the development. 

foushee mews phase 2

Site work on Foushee Mews’ second phase is visible from the first units’ outdoor terraces.

Foushee Mews has been in the works since 2019 and is rising on a roughly 1-acre plot that had been a parking lot. 

From April 2021 to December 2022, Eagle gradually acquired the land it needed for the project for about $2 million. The only parcels the Henrico-based builder didn’t acquire are a pair of two-story homes on the western end of the 11-13 S. Foushee St. block. 

Nathan Blinn, Eagle’s VP of construction, designed the buildings and said a lot of care and thought went into the design of the Georgian-style townhomes.

“The goal of the design was to compliment and take hints from the local vernacular,” Blinn said. “Our commitment to staying true to Richmond’s architectural history can be seen in the dentil molding on the exterior – each piece was measured out and placed by hand for consistency to fit in with the historic charm.”

foushee mews interior

Foushee Mews’ units will range from 2,400 to 3,500 square feet.

Amenities at Foushee Mews include two-car garages and outdoor terraces. The 2,400-square-foot units feature three bedrooms and 3.5 baths, and the 3,500-square-foot units feature four bedrooms and 4.5 baths. 

Of the six completed units, Turner said three are move-in ready, two are built up to the drywall stage to accommodate buyer customization of things like flooring, cabinets and countertops, and one unit has been sold, however that sale is not reflected in the city’s property records. 

The townhomes are priced from $810,000 to $875,000 and are being marketed by Eagle in-house. 

Eagle also is staying busy south of the river, as Turner said the company recently began the sales process for the final 14 units at McRae & Lacy, a waterfront townhome project at 401 W. Seventh St. in Manchester. 

Correction: Eagle is marketing the townhomes in-house. An earlier version of the story named a real estate sales team that Eagle said is not selling the homes. Courtney Turner’s name also has been corrected in the story.

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Bruce Milam
Bruce Milam
1 year ago

This is wonderful. The City needs more for-sale product for stability sake. The apartment construction has been an enormous boost for the City housing but for long term stability, we need people to buy-in, participate politically, and help stabilize their communities. We need families with children and pressure to improve the schools. Perhaps someday the GA and the Governor will join to take the big step of eliminating the jurisdictional boundaries between cities and counties as most other states have done, and we can thrive more efficiently. Probably not in my lifetime, but maybe someday.

Betsy Gardner
Betsy Gardner
1 year ago
Reply to  Bruce Milam

Absolutely. Rome has been burning while city council fiddles and our mayors work to seek higher offices. I love Richmond and have been a long time resident. It’s depressing every election cycle because you know nothing will change.

Victoria Woodhull
Victoria Woodhull
1 year ago
Reply to  Bruce Milam

I too LOVE the fact that the city is building condo and townhome properties! Yes, we need the personal property taxes and the community stabilization.
You mention “eliminating the jurisdictional boundaries” = absolutely not! We do not want the city’s incompetence, and irresponsible fiscal rot to permeate the counties.

Josh McCullar, Architect
Josh McCullar, Architect
1 year ago
Reply to  Bruce Milam

While I’ve lived here for over 20 years, I grew up in both Carolinas where our greatest cities were the official seats of counties. I have always wished Richmond was the county seat of Henrico County. Go to Raleigh, Wilmington, Charlotte, or Charleston to see why. Results will be self evident.

Justin Ranson
Justin Ranson
1 year ago
Reply to  Bruce Milam

You can bw an “owner” of an apartment unit, too, although It’s not really a thing in RVA. It’s pretty common just about everywhere north of VA.

Joanna Ryan
Joanna Ryan
1 year ago

I miss the days before people from DC, NY, and NJ “discovered” Richmond, when housing here was still cheap and plentiful.

Ramone Antonio
Ramone Antonio
1 year ago
Reply to  Joanna Ryan

For 810,000 ??? Yea that’s ridiculous

Gina Lawson
Gina Lawson
1 year ago
Reply to  Ramone Antonio

They seem at least 50k overpriced

Victoria Woodhull
Victoria Woodhull
1 year ago
Reply to  Gina Lawson

IMHO on a 30 year horizon – there is not much difference in $810 and $760? If I can afford $810, my custom stove and refrigerator cost $50K.

Victoria Woodhull
Victoria Woodhull
1 year ago
Reply to  Joanna Ryan

Richmond housing is expensive due to increased taxes and assessments. Richmond should only build condos or townhomes from this point forward – no more rental! Bruce above points out the obvious benefits home ownership brings to a city.

Leon Phoenix
Leon Phoenix
1 year ago

Respect to Nathan Blinn for preserving the architectural integrity of the neighborhood. If more builders did this, in-filling vacant gaps and creating modern spaces with architectural continuity, there would be much less push back from residents when new buildings go up. This guy gets it. He understands Richmond and has a full grasp of contextualism (as apposed to whomever is slapping up these hideous 5-over-1s all over Richmond). Congrats to Blinn and Eagle for getting it right on this project.

Lucas de Block
Lucas de Block
9 months ago

Hopefully a lot of this eventually turn into commercial space. It’s not dense enough for downtown.