Sobering news: Happy hour bill fizzes out

It looks as though bar patrons will still need the secret password to find out about happy hours at their favorite watering holes across town.

A bill introduced this year to the Virginia Assembly to allow bars to advertise their happy hour specials online was scrapped late last month.

Republican Del. David Albo, who introduced the measure, decided to put the cork back in the bill after feeling some pressure, according to a story in the Virginia Gazette.

“A bunch of people who are against underage drinking were concerned about the bill,” Albo told the publication. “I did not really understand their opposition, because even if an underage person saw the website, they still could not go to the restaurant and purchase alcohol.”

BizSense first reported in February that Democratic Del. David Englin, who represents the Alexandria and Arlington district, introduced a similar bill into the assembly. Englin’s was combined with Albo’s on Feb. 7.

The bill was presented Jan. 10 and passed through the House a month later.

A week later, Albo withdrew the bill at the request of the Senate Rehabilitation and Social Services Committee.

 

It looks as though bar patrons will still need the secret password to find out about happy hours at their favorite watering holes across town.

A bill introduced this year to the Virginia Assembly to allow bars to advertise their happy hour specials online was scrapped late last month.

Republican Del. David Albo, who introduced the measure, decided to put the cork back in the bill after feeling some pressure, according to a story in the Virginia Gazette.

“A bunch of people who are against underage drinking were concerned about the bill,” Albo told the publication. “I did not really understand their opposition, because even if an underage person saw the website, they still could not go to the restaurant and purchase alcohol.”

BizSense first reported in February that Democratic Del. David Englin, who represents the Alexandria and Arlington district, introduced a similar bill into the assembly. Englin’s was combined with Albo’s on Feb. 7.

The bill was presented Jan. 10 and passed through the House a month later.

A week later, Albo withdrew the bill at the request of the Senate Rehabilitation and Social Services Committee.

 

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Brian Keller
Brian Keller
10 years ago

And he folded anyway, even though he didn’t understand that their complaint had nothing to do with the bill? So restaurant owners can’t drive their business because a legislator has no backbone! Bozo.

Green
Green
10 years ago

Agreed — what a weak move to withdraw a bill even though you clearly aren’t swayed by opponents’ arguments. It’s too bad. Removal of senseless and ineffective regulation is always a good thing.

Funny how conservatives are against big government, except when it comes to social issues….

Tom Dorsey
Tom Dorsey
10 years ago

Great example of politicians who are totally tuned out to the needs of the business community. The good news is Americans who run businesses always find a way to succeed in spite of politicians who only live for votes.