Buyer found for Blue Bee Cider in Scott’s Addition

The Blue Bee Cider building is constructed out of cobblestones that once paved Richmond streets. (BizSense file photos)

Changes are in the works at a Scott’s Addition cidery, and they may include bringing a different kind of booze to the site.

Blue Bee Cider owner Courtney Mailey.

Blue Bee Cider owner Courtney Mailey confirmed this week that her cidery’s property at 1320 Summit Ave. is under contract to be sold and that negotiations are underway for a sale of the business.

Mailey listed the 0.35-acre property that houses Blue Bee over the summer for $3.2 million and has continued to run the cidery onsite.

It’s unclear who the prospective buyer is, but city documents filed this week propose new uses for the property such as a distillery and tasting room, as well as a market, bakery and restaurant.

The letter was filed by attorney Victor Shaheen II of Shaheen Law Firm, who declined to comment on behalf of his client. Mailey said she could not comment further. Thalhimer’s Gregg Beck is representing Mailey in the sale.

The cidery’s four buildings were built from city street cobblestones and were once used as a horse and mule stable. The city sold the site to Mailey in 2016 for $395,000. The four buildings frame an outdoor courtyard in the heart of Scott’s Addition.

The Blue Bee Cider building is constructed out of cobblestones that once paved Richmond streets. (BizSense file photos)

Changes are in the works at a Scott’s Addition cidery, and they may include bringing a different kind of booze to the site.

Blue Bee Cider owner Courtney Mailey.

Blue Bee Cider owner Courtney Mailey confirmed this week that her cidery’s property at 1320 Summit Ave. is under contract to be sold and that negotiations are underway for a sale of the business.

Mailey listed the 0.35-acre property that houses Blue Bee over the summer for $3.2 million and has continued to run the cidery onsite.

It’s unclear who the prospective buyer is, but city documents filed this week propose new uses for the property such as a distillery and tasting room, as well as a market, bakery and restaurant.

The letter was filed by attorney Victor Shaheen II of Shaheen Law Firm, who declined to comment on behalf of his client. Mailey said she could not comment further. Thalhimer’s Gregg Beck is representing Mailey in the sale.

The cidery’s four buildings were built from city street cobblestones and were once used as a horse and mule stable. The city sold the site to Mailey in 2016 for $395,000. The four buildings frame an outdoor courtyard in the heart of Scott’s Addition.

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Michelle Reynolds
Michelle Reynolds
1 month ago

Glad that it seems like the new owner will continue to use the property in similar capacity rather than it being bulldozed for residential construction.

On some level it kind of seems like a farce that so much Scott’s Addition re-development has been buoyed by historic tax credits yet this very unique property is not historically protected.

karl hott
karl hott
1 month ago

Yet another great deal for the city who sold this for pennies on the dollar. Who wouldn’t cash in on a handout from Richmond?

David Humphrey
David Humphrey
1 month ago
Reply to  karl hott

I think that is pretty disingenuous in this case. The property was quite deteriorated when it was bought for “pennies” and was in an area where something like this was still a gamble. There was a lot of hard work to get the property and business to the point that it is now. Your question should be “Who wouldn’t want to cash in on a ton of hard work.” I’m all for calling out the City where needed, but selling this property not only helped get a property off the books, but also gave an opportunity to a local business… Read more »

charles Frankenhoff
charles Frankenhoff
1 month ago
Reply to  David Humphrey

I don’t want to knock her, but it was a sweetheart sale at the time. There were 11 other groups willing to pay more by recollection. City picked her over higher bids.

Ed Christina
Ed Christina
1 month ago

Really? Can you post a link or share proof? What was the reason at the time for turning down higher bids?

Jeff Stein
Jeff Stein
1 month ago
Reply to  karl hott

Since it’s now on the tax rolls, it’s a great deal for everyone in the city.