Cidery ponders its future after listing its Scott’s Addition real estate for $3M

From left, Truckle Cheesemongers owner Maggie Bradshaw and Blue Bee Cider owner Courtney Mailey. (BizSense file photo)

The future of a Scott’s Addition cidery is up in the air as it lists its prime real estate for sale.

Blue Bee Cider’s compound at 1320 Summit Ave. hit the market this week with an asking price of $3.2 million.

Owner Courtney Mailey said whether the cidery will continue operating there will depend on a buyer’s plans.

“I’m hoping to find a buyer who’ll love and appreciate it as much as I do,” Mailey said of the property. “We’re just trying to find the right match. Once the building finds the right owner, we’ll start to think about the cidery.”

Blue Bee continues to operate while the building is on the market, and Mailey said the property wouldn’t be available for any potential new occupancy until the end of the year.

The cidery’s building is constructed out of cobblestones that once paved Richmond streets. (Mike Platania photos)

Blue Bee’s complex was once a city-owned horse and mule stable, with its buildings made from the cobblestones from city streets. In 2016, Mailey bought it from the city for $395,000 and relocated her cidery there from Manchester.

The 0.35-acre property was most recently assessed by the city at $1.6 million. Thalhimer’s Gregg Beck has the listing.

The site is being pitched as both a redevelopment or owner-occupant opportunity, citing possible uses that include creative office, retail or light manufacturing. The flier for the listing also points out that the buildings are not historically protected.

Mailey said she feels like her personal bandwidth has been stretched lately, which also contributed to the decision to list Blue Bee’s home for sale.

“I have my family that I’m taking care of and am trying to look after. I just find that more and more I’m not able to say ‘yes’ to my parents, who are in their 80s, as much as I’d like to,” Mailey said. “It’s really about trying to find more balance. I do love it but, you know, life happens and priorities change.”

The site includes multiple buildings and has a courtyard.

Real estate in Scott’s Addition has been selling for around $4 million per acre of late, the highest per-acre tally the neighborhood’s ever seen.

Capital Square recently bought N. Chasen & Son and Boulevard Baptist Church’s holdings for $4 million per acre, and last year a pair of D.C. developers bought 3.3 acres along Arthur Ashe Boulevard for $12.5 million. Thalhimer Realty Partners also recently snagged a 2-acre industrial property in the area for just shy of $4 million per-acre.

With the future of Blue Bee’s home unclear, another tenant at the property is making a move to secure its future.

Truckle Cheesemongers, a cheese shop that’s operated out of Blue Bee for three years, is moving to Boho Studio’s former home at 714 N. Sheppard St. in the Museum District.

The new space will be 1,500 square feet, a major upgrade from its 200 square feet currently at Blue Bee. Owner Maggie Bradshaw said the extra space will allow the business to expand its offerings.

Truckle Cheesemongers is moving to 714 N. Sheppard St.

“I’m calling it a cheese bar,” Bradshaw said of the new spot. “It’ll have seating areas and a small bar. We’ll still do cut-to-order (cheese), we’ll just have more products and do more prepared food.”

Truckle will also offer flights of beer, wine and cheese, and Bradshaw said she’s planning to sell breads, pastries and coffee.

“I want it to be more of an all-day place,” she said.

Truckle Cheese Bar is looking to open in the fall.

From left, Truckle Cheesemongers owner Maggie Bradshaw and Blue Bee Cider owner Courtney Mailey. (BizSense file photo)

The future of a Scott’s Addition cidery is up in the air as it lists its prime real estate for sale.

Blue Bee Cider’s compound at 1320 Summit Ave. hit the market this week with an asking price of $3.2 million.

Owner Courtney Mailey said whether the cidery will continue operating there will depend on a buyer’s plans.

“I’m hoping to find a buyer who’ll love and appreciate it as much as I do,” Mailey said of the property. “We’re just trying to find the right match. Once the building finds the right owner, we’ll start to think about the cidery.”

Blue Bee continues to operate while the building is on the market, and Mailey said the property wouldn’t be available for any potential new occupancy until the end of the year.

The cidery’s building is constructed out of cobblestones that once paved Richmond streets. (Mike Platania photos)

Blue Bee’s complex was once a city-owned horse and mule stable, with its buildings made from the cobblestones from city streets. In 2016, Mailey bought it from the city for $395,000 and relocated her cidery there from Manchester.

The 0.35-acre property was most recently assessed by the city at $1.6 million. Thalhimer’s Gregg Beck has the listing.

The site is being pitched as both a redevelopment or owner-occupant opportunity, citing possible uses that include creative office, retail or light manufacturing. The flier for the listing also points out that the buildings are not historically protected.

Mailey said she feels like her personal bandwidth has been stretched lately, which also contributed to the decision to list Blue Bee’s home for sale.

“I have my family that I’m taking care of and am trying to look after. I just find that more and more I’m not able to say ‘yes’ to my parents, who are in their 80s, as much as I’d like to,” Mailey said. “It’s really about trying to find more balance. I do love it but, you know, life happens and priorities change.”

The site includes multiple buildings and has a courtyard.

Real estate in Scott’s Addition has been selling for around $4 million per acre of late, the highest per-acre tally the neighborhood’s ever seen.

Capital Square recently bought N. Chasen & Son and Boulevard Baptist Church’s holdings for $4 million per acre, and last year a pair of D.C. developers bought 3.3 acres along Arthur Ashe Boulevard for $12.5 million. Thalhimer Realty Partners also recently snagged a 2-acre industrial property in the area for just shy of $4 million per-acre.

With the future of Blue Bee’s home unclear, another tenant at the property is making a move to secure its future.

Truckle Cheesemongers, a cheese shop that’s operated out of Blue Bee for three years, is moving to Boho Studio’s former home at 714 N. Sheppard St. in the Museum District.

The new space will be 1,500 square feet, a major upgrade from its 200 square feet currently at Blue Bee. Owner Maggie Bradshaw said the extra space will allow the business to expand its offerings.

Truckle Cheesemongers is moving to 714 N. Sheppard St.

“I’m calling it a cheese bar,” Bradshaw said of the new spot. “It’ll have seating areas and a small bar. We’ll still do cut-to-order (cheese), we’ll just have more products and do more prepared food.”

Truckle will also offer flights of beer, wine and cheese, and Bradshaw said she’s planning to sell breads, pastries and coffee.

“I want it to be more of an all-day place,” she said.

Truckle Cheese Bar is looking to open in the fall.

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David Humphrey
David Humphrey
1 month ago

I don’t often say this, but the loss of that property to redevelopment would be really sad. It is a gem for that area. I wish it could be picked up and moved.

Boz Boschen
Boz Boschen
1 month ago
Reply to  David Humphrey

It’s true, I’ve hosted numerous events there over the years because there’s nothing else like it. I can’t say I blame them if the return on that investment is life-altering for their futures, but I hope they continue the cidery and reinvest in our city in a new unique location.

Michael P Morgan-Dodson
Michael P Morgan-Dodson
1 month ago
Reply to  Boz Boschen

Don’t worry post sale the out of state developer will announce its replacement building that will be as unique and eye catching at those Icon Apartments.

Brian Glass
Brian Glass
1 month ago

In all probability the sale of the property is more valuable than the operation of the cidery. It’s still a good time to cash out !