Reynolds Crossing eyed for major mixed-use reinvention

reynolds crossing aerial1 Cropped

The 31-acre parcel at the corner of Forest Avenue and West Broad is being eyed for redevelopment. (Google Earth)

Another major mixed-use redevelopment is on the drawing board for Henrico’s west end. 

Reynolds Development is in the early stages of plotting a reinvention of parts of its Reynolds Crossing complex at the corner of West Broad Street and Forest Avenue. 

Increased density and height are in mind, as preliminary plans show about a half-dozen new buildings, most of which would be mixed-use or residential, to join the existing office, retail and Westin Richmond hotel building on the property.

Plans call for the new buildings to reach as high as 10 or 12 stories, with townhomes or low-rise condos in the center of the area. In total, the redevelopment could add over 1,200 dwelling units to the area. 

The majority of the area targeted for development is currently covered by surface parking lots. The land in question is split across eight parcels with addresses running from 6603 to 6641 W. Broad St. The parcels are currently zoned for either business or industrial use.

None of the existing buildings at Reynolds Crossing would be demolished. 

Reynolds Development, the real estate arm of the Reynolds family business that was built on Reynolds Metals, is seeking to rezone 31 acres of Reynolds Crossing’s 58 acres using Henrico’s Urban Mixed Use designation. The company unveiled its preliminary plans at a community meeting at the complex last week. 

Representatives for Reynolds Development weren’t available for additional comment on Friday. 

reynolds crossing Cropped scaled

Some office buildings at Reynolds Crossing date back to the 1960s, while others were built in the 2010s. (Mike Platania photo)

At the meeting representatives for Reynolds said the intent of the redevelopment is to utilize the land in a more effective manner, and that the development would occur in phases over 15 to 20 years. 

Beyond the new buildings, Reynolds is also looking to reconfigure the existing streetscape into a grid-like layout, complete with bike and pedestrian pathways, plazas and landscaped open spaces, in order to be a “comfortable, pedestrian-friendly atmosphere.”

Reynolds would also have control over additional ingresses and egresses from the area, as it owns the stretch of Forest Avenue that runs between West Broad Street and Glenside Drive. 

The nearby Walmart Supercenter and Glenside-facing retail strip center would not be included in the rezoning request, nor would the Virginia Eye Institute and Virginia Urology offices at 6900-6946 Forest Ave.

Baskervill is working with Reynolds on the design and master planning process, and Roth Jackson’s Andy Condlin is representing the firm in the rezoning process. 

Reynolds Crossing is the fourth sizable mixed-use development that’s in the works for the western Henrico area using the county’s UMU designation. 

The Ukrop family and Pivot Development are planning Westmoreland Crossing, a development that would reimagine the Ukrop’s Homestyle Foods complex with multifamily, retail, hotel and office uses. 

The owners of Willow Lawn Shopping Center also are planning a years-long redevelopment that could add over half of a million square feet of commercial space and thousands of residential units to the longtime shopping center. 

Kinsale Capital Group and Marchetti Development are looking to redevelop the former Anthem Inc. campus at the corner of West Broad Street and Staples Mill Road to add a hotel, nearly 700 apartments and hundreds of thousands of square feet of new office and retail space in a project they’re calling Kinsale Center. 

Westmoreland Crossing, Willow Lawn and Kinsale Center have all received UMU rezoning approval from Henrico County

Directly across from Reynolds Crossing is the 45-acre Genworth campus that’s also being eyed for redevelopment. The company issued an RFP for the 45-acre plot in 2021 and last summer selected Greenberg Gibbons, a firm out of Baltimore, to lead its redevelopment.

reynolds crossing aerial1 Cropped

The 31-acre parcel at the corner of Forest Avenue and West Broad is being eyed for redevelopment. (Google Earth)

Another major mixed-use redevelopment is on the drawing board for Henrico’s west end. 

Reynolds Development is in the early stages of plotting a reinvention of parts of its Reynolds Crossing complex at the corner of West Broad Street and Forest Avenue. 

Increased density and height are in mind, as preliminary plans show about a half-dozen new buildings, most of which would be mixed-use or residential, to join the existing office, retail and Westin Richmond hotel building on the property.

Plans call for the new buildings to reach as high as 10 or 12 stories, with townhomes or low-rise condos in the center of the area. In total, the redevelopment could add over 1,200 dwelling units to the area. 

The majority of the area targeted for development is currently covered by surface parking lots. The land in question is split across eight parcels with addresses running from 6603 to 6641 W. Broad St. The parcels are currently zoned for either business or industrial use.

None of the existing buildings at Reynolds Crossing would be demolished. 

Reynolds Development, the real estate arm of the Reynolds family business that was built on Reynolds Metals, is seeking to rezone 31 acres of Reynolds Crossing’s 58 acres using Henrico’s Urban Mixed Use designation. The company unveiled its preliminary plans at a community meeting at the complex last week. 

Representatives for Reynolds Development weren’t available for additional comment on Friday. 

reynolds crossing Cropped scaled

Some office buildings at Reynolds Crossing date back to the 1960s, while others were built in the 2010s. (Mike Platania photo)

At the meeting representatives for Reynolds said the intent of the redevelopment is to utilize the land in a more effective manner, and that the development would occur in phases over 15 to 20 years. 

Beyond the new buildings, Reynolds is also looking to reconfigure the existing streetscape into a grid-like layout, complete with bike and pedestrian pathways, plazas and landscaped open spaces, in order to be a “comfortable, pedestrian-friendly atmosphere.”

Reynolds would also have control over additional ingresses and egresses from the area, as it owns the stretch of Forest Avenue that runs between West Broad Street and Glenside Drive. 

The nearby Walmart Supercenter and Glenside-facing retail strip center would not be included in the rezoning request, nor would the Virginia Eye Institute and Virginia Urology offices at 6900-6946 Forest Ave.

Baskervill is working with Reynolds on the design and master planning process, and Roth Jackson’s Andy Condlin is representing the firm in the rezoning process. 

Reynolds Crossing is the fourth sizable mixed-use development that’s in the works for the western Henrico area using the county’s UMU designation. 

The Ukrop family and Pivot Development are planning Westmoreland Crossing, a development that would reimagine the Ukrop’s Homestyle Foods complex with multifamily, retail, hotel and office uses. 

The owners of Willow Lawn Shopping Center also are planning a years-long redevelopment that could add over half of a million square feet of commercial space and thousands of residential units to the longtime shopping center. 

Kinsale Capital Group and Marchetti Development are looking to redevelop the former Anthem Inc. campus at the corner of West Broad Street and Staples Mill Road to add a hotel, nearly 700 apartments and hundreds of thousands of square feet of new office and retail space in a project they’re calling Kinsale Center. 

Westmoreland Crossing, Willow Lawn and Kinsale Center have all received UMU rezoning approval from Henrico County

Directly across from Reynolds Crossing is the 45-acre Genworth campus that’s also being eyed for redevelopment. The company issued an RFP for the 45-acre plot in 2021 and last summer selected Greenberg Gibbons, a firm out of Baltimore, to lead its redevelopment.

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David Humphrey
David Humphrey
1 month ago

Also, don’t forget Libbie Mill that is still getting built out.

Christopher Muller
Christopher Muller
1 month ago

Adding housing and mixed use density, in place of acres of surface parking, directly off main roads that can handle the extra traffic. What’s not to like? Hopefully the new buildings will draw inspiration from the architectural style of the notable current ones (like the adjacent Altria HQ) rather than being lookalikes of the prevailing style we’ve seen in so many other recent builds.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 month ago

Yup!

Bob Furguson
Bob Furguson
1 month ago

Accept where are all the kids living in these townhomes going to school. All of the schools close to this site are currently full. The county does not seem to be willing to build enough new ones to handle the current student population. The rebuilt Tucker and did not add any additional seats. So now they want to redistrict. Seem like they need to focus on getting ahead of the curve not waiting until it get out of hand.

Mike LaBelle
Mike LaBelle
1 month ago

I cannot help but wonder where are the people coming from to fill all these new condos and apartments? They seem to be popping up everywhere- Broad street, Staplesmill Road, Northside, Scotts addition,The Diamond VUU area, Short pump,Near west end..Where does it stop? I am a retired contractor so building is in my blood, I just can’t see where the people are coming from to fill them up not to mention the cost ofsome of these are pretty high.Not to mention the ones I have seen are almost exclusively wood framed, I remember the VCU student apartments that burnt up… Read more »

Ed Christina
Ed Christina
1 month ago
Reply to  Mike LaBelle

The people are coming from NOVA, and we

Carl Schwendeman
Carl Schwendeman
1 month ago
Reply to  Mike LaBelle

There are a lot of people trapped living in their parents houses and there is a skyrocketing homeless population there is a ton of pent up demand for housing. Also a lot of local planning commissions do everything in there power to limit the housing supply by keeping everything imaginary rural.

Khan Xmir
Khan Xmir
1 month ago
Reply to  Mike LaBelle

You are right about the inherent fire danger from apartment buildings with wood frames.
Steel and concrete cost a little more but are safer from fire damage, wind damage and insect damage.
Cutting costs only puts lives at risk.

Carl Schwendeman
Carl Schwendeman
1 month ago

I find it amazing how vast the sea of asphalt is in this current development if they put a parking deck in and built several 6 to 15 story buildings here they could easily add 2,000 units of housing without cutting down a single tree.

I’m glad there is a backlash agonist vast empty parking lots.

Tom Bonomo
Tom Bonomo
1 month ago

The ingress / egress onto Forest Avenue is not the real traffic issue. The issue is the intersections of Forest and Broad St and Glenside Drive. Those intersection are already a nightmare before adding a couple of thousand new cars