Developers Gecker, Miller list 19th-century Shockoe mansion-turned-offices

Pace King1

The Pace-King House on 19th Street in Shockoe Bottom is for sale. (Photos courtesy CVRMLS)

One of the older buildings in Richmond’s oldest neighborhood is up for grabs with a seven-figure price tag.

The 19th-century Pace-King House at 205 N. 19th St. hit the market in recent weeks with an asking price of $1.8 million.

The Italianate-style mansion-turned-office building was listed April 22 by sellers Dan Gecker and Robin Miller, whose Urban Development Associates took over an unfinished renovation of the property after they purchased it in 2011.

The firm had kept an office in the building since then and leased out parts of it to other tenants. The quarter-acre property also includes an outbuilding with three one-bedroom apartments.

Pace King5

The 1860s-era mansion has been converted to offices.

Miller, who keeps his own office in Linden Tower in Monroe Ward, said they’re selling the Pace-King building because Gecker, a former Chesterfield County supervisor, no longer needs it.

Robin Miller

Robin Miller

“That was his office and we had a big conference room there, and he doesn’t need it anymore,” Miller said. “He’s going to be working from home on what he’s still working with, so it just made sense to go ahead and sell it.”

Gecker said in an email that he’s not retiring and continues to work on real estate and nonprofit projects remotely.

“It is true that we no longer need the office,” Gecker said. “We do very few in-person meetings anymore and most things can be done remotely.”

Tom Rosman and Lory Markham of One South Commercial have the listing.

After paying $700,000 for it in 2011, Miller and Gecker put in another $500,000 or so for rehabbing the property, which a previous owner had started converting into apartments. The duo used state and federal tax credits to renovate the main building as offices.

“It’s a wonderful building,” Miller said. “It’s got three great apartments in the back. It’s perfect for a small company. There’s six separate large offices in the building, two on each floor.”

Built in 1860, the building is one of the older structures in Shockoe Bottom, which also is home to the nearby Adam Craig House and Masons’ Hall, both of which date to the 1780s.

The Pace-King building totals over 7,000 square feet and features a cast-iron veranda and fencing. The building is named for two of its owners over the years: James B. Pace, a tobacconist and city treasurer who owned it from 1865 to 1881; and Jane King, who bought it from Pace and owned it until 1911, according to its National Register of Historic Places nomination form.

Pace King4

The building’s rooms feature high ceilings and windows, as well as hardwood floors and fireplaces.

The property was listed to the national and Virginia registers in 1976, when it was “rescued from dereliction” by the group now known as Preservation Virginia. It was later sold and restored as offices for Scope Mechanical Contractors, according to the Virginia Landmarks Commission.

The commission describes the main house as “one of the city of Richmond’s last grand mansions erected before the Civil War” and its scale and detailing as “representing a final expression of architectural fashion before the dissolution of the Old South.”

Rosman said the apartments total 2,600 square feet. The rear yard includes a brick patio and fountain.

Pace King3

Three one-bedroom apartments are in an outbuilding behind the main house.

Since listing it, Rosman said he and Markham have shown the property a handful of times, including to a group that was interested in making it a co-working space. Rosman said the building would appeal to law firms, financial firms and creative office users.

“It’s going to be somebody that appreciates an older building, appreciates the craftsmanship,” he said.

The property is next door to a former synagogue that’s now the Shockoe Valley Lofts, an apartment conversion that Miller’s Miller & Associates completed in 2003.

According to a 2013 Style Weekly article, the buildings were part of a Jewish enclave that made up part of Richmond’s original street grid, which spanned from 17th to 25th streets and from Broad Street to the river.

The Pace-King House property is assessed by the city at $1.5 million.

Note: This story has been updated with input received after publication from Dan Gecker, who said he is not retiring as was previously reported. 

Pace King1

The Pace-King House on 19th Street in Shockoe Bottom is for sale. (Photos courtesy CVRMLS)

One of the older buildings in Richmond’s oldest neighborhood is up for grabs with a seven-figure price tag.

The 19th-century Pace-King House at 205 N. 19th St. hit the market in recent weeks with an asking price of $1.8 million.

The Italianate-style mansion-turned-office building was listed April 22 by sellers Dan Gecker and Robin Miller, whose Urban Development Associates took over an unfinished renovation of the property after they purchased it in 2011.

The firm had kept an office in the building since then and leased out parts of it to other tenants. The quarter-acre property also includes an outbuilding with three one-bedroom apartments.

Pace King5

The 1860s-era mansion has been converted to offices.

Miller, who keeps his own office in Linden Tower in Monroe Ward, said they’re selling the Pace-King building because Gecker, a former Chesterfield County supervisor, no longer needs it.

Robin Miller

Robin Miller

“That was his office and we had a big conference room there, and he doesn’t need it anymore,” Miller said. “He’s going to be working from home on what he’s still working with, so it just made sense to go ahead and sell it.”

Gecker said in an email that he’s not retiring and continues to work on real estate and nonprofit projects remotely.

“It is true that we no longer need the office,” Gecker said. “We do very few in-person meetings anymore and most things can be done remotely.”

Tom Rosman and Lory Markham of One South Commercial have the listing.

After paying $700,000 for it in 2011, Miller and Gecker put in another $500,000 or so for rehabbing the property, which a previous owner had started converting into apartments. The duo used state and federal tax credits to renovate the main building as offices.

“It’s a wonderful building,” Miller said. “It’s got three great apartments in the back. It’s perfect for a small company. There’s six separate large offices in the building, two on each floor.”

Built in 1860, the building is one of the older structures in Shockoe Bottom, which also is home to the nearby Adam Craig House and Masons’ Hall, both of which date to the 1780s.

The Pace-King building totals over 7,000 square feet and features a cast-iron veranda and fencing. The building is named for two of its owners over the years: James B. Pace, a tobacconist and city treasurer who owned it from 1865 to 1881; and Jane King, who bought it from Pace and owned it until 1911, according to its National Register of Historic Places nomination form.

Pace King4

The building’s rooms feature high ceilings and windows, as well as hardwood floors and fireplaces.

The property was listed to the national and Virginia registers in 1976, when it was “rescued from dereliction” by the group now known as Preservation Virginia. It was later sold and restored as offices for Scope Mechanical Contractors, according to the Virginia Landmarks Commission.

The commission describes the main house as “one of the city of Richmond’s last grand mansions erected before the Civil War” and its scale and detailing as “representing a final expression of architectural fashion before the dissolution of the Old South.”

Rosman said the apartments total 2,600 square feet. The rear yard includes a brick patio and fountain.

Pace King3

Three one-bedroom apartments are in an outbuilding behind the main house.

Since listing it, Rosman said he and Markham have shown the property a handful of times, including to a group that was interested in making it a co-working space. Rosman said the building would appeal to law firms, financial firms and creative office users.

“It’s going to be somebody that appreciates an older building, appreciates the craftsmanship,” he said.

The property is next door to a former synagogue that’s now the Shockoe Valley Lofts, an apartment conversion that Miller’s Miller & Associates completed in 2003.

According to a 2013 Style Weekly article, the buildings were part of a Jewish enclave that made up part of Richmond’s original street grid, which spanned from 17th to 25th streets and from Broad Street to the river.

The Pace-King House property is assessed by the city at $1.5 million.

Note: This story has been updated with input received after publication from Dan Gecker, who said he is not retiring as was previously reported. 

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Bruce Milam
Bruce Milam
22 days ago

This is a beautiful building. There’s an English basement with more office space down a flight of steps beneath the front porch too. Robin spends a great deal of time renovating Staunton anyway and it’s worth the drive to see his new hometown in the valley. Good hunting wishes to Tom and Lori for the buyer!

Michael Morgan-Dodson
Michael Morgan-Dodson
22 days ago
Reply to  Bruce Milam

LOL, either they adjusted the article or Robin did say that. Two big offices on each floor (first, second, and English basement) Gives you a total of six offices.

And Robin and Dan deserve the lifetime achievement award for RVa preservation. Happy (sounds like semi-) Retirement to Dan!

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
19 days ago
Reply to  Bruce Milam

Yes, love that cornice and porch! Also that it looks like its a little compound — someone could even LIVE in an apt and have their offices right there! I learned to love the projects that Miller does when I moved to Richmond in 2003 when looking at the Lee School and I watched his presentation for the High Street Lofts, the first “Bigger” developer to take a chance on Petersburg (Can you believe there were actually some “HIstoric NIMBYs” there? I can. There are ALWAYS grumpy ideologues who have an emotional need to control more to make the perfect… Read more »

Peter James
Peter James
22 days ago

Absolutely gorgeous building.