Selling Scott’s Addition HQ for double its cost sounds good to recording studio

The 12,000-square-foot building is in the northeast corner of Scott’s Addition’s historic district. (Mike Platania photo)

After cashing out its Scott’s Addition home for twice what it paid for it four years ago, a longtime local recording studio is on the move yet again.

Sound of Music Recording Studios, which has made a name for itself over the last three decades working with local artists both small and large, including Lamb of God, D’Angelo and GWAR, sold its headquarters this month at 1710 Altamont Ave. for $1.17 million.

The company bought the 12,000-square-foot building for $585,000 in 2016.

John Morand, who co-owns Sound of Music with Bruce Smith and Wallace Dietz, said they’re now preparing to move out at the end of the year.

John Morand, left, and Bruce Smith of Sound of Music. (BizSense file)

“The offer we got was kind of ridiculous,” Morand said. “It just got overvalued for a recording studio and the neighborhood got too congested. It was bigger than what we needed.”

Sound of Music operated in only 2,000 square feet of the building, with the rest leased out to 18 other businesses of all sorts, including One Three Guitar, which was spawned last year by a pair of former Guitar Works employees.

The buyer in the deal, according to city records, was The Bakery Studios LLC, represented by attorney Robert Allen of ThorsenAllen.

Allen deferred comment to his client, who could not be reached for comment. Morand said he doesn’t know much about the buyer, but added he thinks the buyer may want to continue using the building as a music studio.

Morand said Sound of Music is actively looking for a new home, something the studio has gotten used to doing over the years.

“It’s not like we haven’t moved before — we’ve moved seven times in 27 years,” he said. “Scott’s Addition is cool but studios don’t need to be in trendy neighborhoods. We were lucky to be involved in the expansion of this neighborhood.”

While many in the music industry have been hit hard by the pandemic, Morand said Sound of Music has been growing.

“Work wise we’re totally slammed, even with the virus we’ve been busier than we’ve been in years,” he said.

The 12,000-square-foot building is in the northeast corner of Scott’s Addition’s historic district. (Mike Platania photo)

After cashing out its Scott’s Addition home for twice what it paid for it four years ago, a longtime local recording studio is on the move yet again.

Sound of Music Recording Studios, which has made a name for itself over the last three decades working with local artists both small and large, including Lamb of God, D’Angelo and GWAR, sold its headquarters this month at 1710 Altamont Ave. for $1.17 million.

The company bought the 12,000-square-foot building for $585,000 in 2016.

John Morand, who co-owns Sound of Music with Bruce Smith and Wallace Dietz, said they’re now preparing to move out at the end of the year.

John Morand, left, and Bruce Smith of Sound of Music. (BizSense file)

“The offer we got was kind of ridiculous,” Morand said. “It just got overvalued for a recording studio and the neighborhood got too congested. It was bigger than what we needed.”

Sound of Music operated in only 2,000 square feet of the building, with the rest leased out to 18 other businesses of all sorts, including One Three Guitar, which was spawned last year by a pair of former Guitar Works employees.

The buyer in the deal, according to city records, was The Bakery Studios LLC, represented by attorney Robert Allen of ThorsenAllen.

Allen deferred comment to his client, who could not be reached for comment. Morand said he doesn’t know much about the buyer, but added he thinks the buyer may want to continue using the building as a music studio.

Morand said Sound of Music is actively looking for a new home, something the studio has gotten used to doing over the years.

“It’s not like we haven’t moved before — we’ve moved seven times in 27 years,” he said. “Scott’s Addition is cool but studios don’t need to be in trendy neighborhoods. We were lucky to be involved in the expansion of this neighborhood.”

While many in the music industry have been hit hard by the pandemic, Morand said Sound of Music has been growing.

“Work wise we’re totally slammed, even with the virus we’ve been busier than we’ve been in years,” he said.

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