Infills adding 11 million-dollar homes near Patterson and Libbie

Enclave at Westview

The first three homes at Richmond Hill Design + Build’s Enclave at Westview infill were recently listed with prices around $1.6 million. (Images courtesy SRMF Real Estate)

The densification of Richmond’s Westhampton area continues with a pair of residential infills that have started taking shape and are set to add nearly a dozen new million-dollar homes near the crossroads of Libbie and Patterson avenues.

Richmond Hill Design + Build has completed the first three of 11 new homes it’s fitting into what had been two larger residential lots in the 500 block of Westview Avenue, off Patterson two blocks east of Libbie.

The three homes are the start of what it’s calling the Enclave at Westview, which will total seven homes of varying architectural styles.

A couple doors down, on the other side of an existing house that’s not included in the developments, four more homes with modern designs will make up a separate infill, to be called Cashel Modern.

Cashel Modern

A rendering of the Cashel Modern homes, which will rise nearby.

All of the homes will be sized around 3,400 square feet and priced around $1.6 million. The two- and three-story homes include four or five bedrooms, 3½ or 4½ bathrooms and two-car garages.

The Enclave’s first homes hit the market this week, including a farmhouse-style house listed at $1.6 million and a Georgian priced $15,000 higher. A transitional-style house rounds out the trio, and the remaining homes to be built include a Tudor, Spanish Revival, New England Shingle Style and Southern Style.

Those homes will be built after the Cashel Modern homes, which are underway and scheduled to be built in about eight months. The three-story modern homes will include mid-level verandas, cable railings and elevators.

Enclave at Westview 3

An existing house separates the Enclave at Westview, left, and Cashel Modern infill sites.

The homes come four years after Richmond Hill filed plans for the infills, which were originally to consist of 13 homes with prices starting at $900,000.

Lloyd Poe, who runs Richmond Hill with his daughter Vanessa Poe, said the increases in costs for materials, land and labor since the project was announced in 2020 drove up the prices, though he noted that sale prices across Richmond have increased as well.

11.19R Lloyd Poe

Lloyd Poe

“The development costs have risen as fast or faster than homebuilding costs, so it’s been a difficult thing to keep up with,” Lloyd said. “That’s part of what’s driving all new construction no matter where you’re building. The cost to get a lot these days has probably almost doubled in five years.”

However, he added, “The market has gone up in value in an equal proportion to the costs rising. What we thought we could do for one number has cost more, but what we thought we could sell it for has gone up as well, so it’s in balance.”

Lloyd put the overall cost for the 1.3-acre project at $2.75 million, up from a $2.25 million estimate in 2020.

The Poes are listing the homes with Mike Hanky, an agent with Shaheen Ruth Martin & Fonville Real Estate who identified the properties as infill opportunities and brought them to Lloyd’s attention.

Hanky said the price point for the Westview homes is based off comparable sales for other new-builds in the area.

Mike Hanky

Mike Hanky

“That’s squarely in line with four or five new homes that have closed within the past six months within a half-mile of that location,” Hanky said, citing sales on nearby Arlie Street and Pepper Avenue and for two of the homes in Maplewood, a similar infill development on Maple Avenue.

“It’s pretty remarkable to us as well, but the market has just caught fire post-Covid. Cost of material, cost of labor obviously has a lot to do with it, but that market and that pocket has just exploded for new construction,” Hanky said.

Hanky and the Poes have worked on infills and rebuilds in other parts of the city, such as Sauer’s Gardens in the West End and near Willow Oaks, but Lloyd agreed that a full-on transformation is occurring along Libbie Avenue not only between Patterson and Libbie but as far south as Cary Street Road.

“If you look at what’s happened on Libbie between Cary and Patterson,  they’re tearing down million-dollar houses and putting up $2 million houses,” Lloyd said. “That whole area has gone crazy in terms of desirability and costs.”

506 Westview

The homes feature open floorplans and first-floor primary suites.

The group expects the Westview homes will be particularly desirable for their location on a dead-end street, as well as access and walkability to area shopping and trails that connect to Libbie Playground.

“You’ve got a very sought-after location for Richmond, but this is at the end of a private street with a cul-de-sac, which is very unique for Richmond,” Hanky said, noting the city’s grid pattern of mostly through-streets. “It’s just a phenomenal location, and it really is private.”

Vanessa, who is designing the homes, also pointed to the variety of home styles and designs, which she said would appeal to a mix of buyers.

WillowOaks Vanessa Poe

Vanessa Poe

“Architecturally speaking, they’re all different elevation styles. Every house in the community is going to have its own different angle for personality,” she said. “We thought that would be a unique spin for the owners, to have their own identity within this community.”

The three completed homes were entered as “coming soon” listings last week and went active Monday. Hanky said he’s marketing the homes with a VIP list and a broker’s open house scheduled today (Wednesday). He said he’s been fielding calls since the homes hit the market.

As they finish out the rest of the homes on Westview, Lloyd said he and Vanessa are keeping an eye out for more infill opportunities in and around the Libbie area, though he noted that 11 homes in one spot is not easy to replicate.

“It’s a very unusual event that you can create a new neighborhood with a private street with seven brand-new houses, all 3,400 square feet and up,” Lloyd said. “You can’t get that, really, in many places in Libbie and Grove.”

Richmond Hill’s infills add to other projects that are increasing the density in and around Westhampton.

Across Patterson, a four-story commercial building is planned to replace the single-story shops at Patterson and Libbie, across from the Westhampton Commons development that continues to fill out.

On Libbie, Eagle Construction of VA is wrapping up its 14-unit Row at Westhampton townhomes, while nearly twice as many condos are in the works farther south. And on Grove, construction continues on a new office building a block over from another office site that’s being marketed as a build-to-suit project.

POSTED IN Residential Real Estate

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Charles Frankenhoff
Charles Frankenhoff
2 days ago

There is a lot of demand for new houses in that area. The only question I have is the modern ones, I wouldn’t say there’s a lot of demand for modern there, so that will be interesting.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
2 days ago

Interesting that you think taste is a big indication in this market, and I thought all these young people were liking modern, again.

I have no idea about the market there or the economics, but perhaps Modern can be a cheaper to build?

Charles Frankenhoff
Charles Frankenhoff
1 day ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

no it tends to be more expensive to build. And young people may well like modern, but that’s not a young people area or price point

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
21 minutes ago

More expensive than what? I guess if it is a bunch of poured concrete walls and big windows, sure.

I’ll just have to take your word for younger people not being the buyers — but I am talking people in their 40s too — all those people who were influenced by Mad Men.

Bruce Milam
Bruce Milam
2 days ago

Lloyd has always been at the cutting edge of new home building so these modern designs from Vanessa do not surprise me. Lloyd can build them and sell them. This modernist movement is striking to say the least. Elevators are the key selling point though. Todays buyers want elevators.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
2 days ago
Reply to  Bruce Milam

“Cutting edge”

I am not sure how that is defined. Elevators? Maybe. Sounds more “High Edge” — and modern was cutting edge in the late 1940s, n’est pas?

Charles Frankenhoff
Charles Frankenhoff
1 day ago
Reply to  Bruce Milam

I don’t know why this is downvoted, I think the elevators are the strongest point.

I wonder who the elevator sub is, do you know? Priority?

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 day ago

To me, having an elevator means you are rich. Costs a lot to maintain.

I’ve only known one person that had an elevator in a SFH — and it was because his house was built on top of a CAVE and he thought it was neat to be able to take guests down there.

Elevator only held one person at a time and you had to cross your arms I think.

Charles Frankenhoff
Charles Frankenhoff
4 hours ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

they are very common in Richmond.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
20 minutes ago

Elevators are very common in SFHs in Richmond?

Michael Boyer
Michael Boyer
2 days ago

I thought there were already existing ranch style homes down that road.

Charles Frankenhoff
Charles Frankenhoff
1 day ago
Reply to  Michael Boyer

a bunch around there, but they are getting scraped off, land value is too much

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 day ago

Yep. Parts of the Richmond Metro are starting to become the Tear-down country that a lot of NoVa has been for over 20 years. I was watching an old American Dad with my daughter and some of Stan Smith’s neighbors were sneering at his house and calling it a “Tear Down” and I had to explain what that meant, since it is not a common term here. I actually looked in that area to find a small, boring house there because of the location and the theory that eventually people would be buying those for the value of the land,… Read more »

Lonzo Harris
Lonzo Harris
2 days ago

I’m old enough to remember when a million dollar house had a little separation, today’s million dollar house you can shake your Neighbors hand without leaving you home

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
2 days ago
Reply to  Lonzo Harris

Location….

Landon Edwards
Landon Edwards
2 days ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

Location depends on perspective, I guess. To gain perspective, one usually has to become acquainted with surrounding circumstances. If you don’t know what’s possible, and/or you find what others would consider sub-standard to be entirely acceptable, and flat out don’t care, then this becomes status quo. And that’s regrettable.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 day ago
Reply to  Landon Edwards

That’s a little bit … opaque? I am not necessarily disagreeing with you — I chose buying a house on 1/4 acre abutting a woods, made out of granite with Bankers Tudor pretensions in a location where not so many posh people wanted to live over a rancher in the neighborhood in question, and my house was a lot cheaper. But, if my income was a lot higher, the equation would be a bit different and I likely would choose to not live in the Richmond Metro at all — so, I certainly don’t think I am a Frog in… Read more »

Charles Frankenhoff
Charles Frankenhoff
1 day ago
Reply to  Lonzo Harris

no one is that old… See JP Morgan’s house in Manhattan etc. This is new as of 1800 or so – google Beacon Hill in Boston if you’d like pics. Etc etc etc

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 day ago

I’m not sure what you are saying, but certainly the more desirable your neighbors, the degree of seperation you desire is inverted.

Landon Edwards
Landon Edwards
2 days ago

A million-6 to be crowded cheek-by-jowl in a neighborhood that dates back to the ’40s or ’50’s? Wow! Just call me stupid. I don’t understand the mentality that would find these attractive, especially when sited in a city as dysfunctional as Richmond. Why? Just WHY???

Carol Nitz
Carol Nitz
2 days ago
Reply to  Landon Edwards

I couldn’t have said it better myself, Landon.

Thomas Carter
Thomas Carter
2 days ago
Reply to  Landon Edwards

Plus, you get to look at all of the super cans the residents across the street leave out all week along Westview Avenue behind their backyard fences.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
2 days ago
Reply to  Landon Edwards

Well, not all locations in Richmond are equal.

NYC is getting increasingly dysfunctional, but people pay a LOT to be jammed even closer together there!!!

Landon Edwards
Landon Edwards
2 days ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

Yep, things can always get worse!

David Adler
David Adler
2 days ago
Reply to  Landon Edwards

My thoughts exactly. No space, no acreage? No million for you!

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 day ago
Reply to  David Adler

That’s why we have Powhatan. Or Lexington.

Martha Lee
Martha Lee
2 days ago
Reply to  Landon Edwards

Because people want to be over there! It’s walkable and it’s very close to long-standing private schools and high end shopping. It’s a status thing. Not that I agree with it, but that’s what it is. Not all of us think it makes sense to pay $65 for a family of 5 to eat ice cream out on a Friday night or to spend $125 on a haircut.

Michael Boyer
Michael Boyer
1 day ago
Reply to  Martha Lee

Those homes will definitely sell and quickly.Theres some people that want that address an pay those prices.Location is important when they give their addresses out.It is a status thing for sure,I guess some figure they’ve worked hard to live the”Leave it to Beaver”life, which there’s nothing wrong with that.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 day ago
Reply to  Michael Boyer

Yes…. and a no.

It is hardly High Status enough that it will raise many eyebrows, and Leave it to Beaver was a middle class neighborhood, nothing more. Eddie Haskel lived there, for instance.

It is more for having easy access to the Gluten Free Cupcake store, good Japanese, good Schools — it is not to show off to the plebes, but rather to be with the patricians.

Michael Boyer
Michael Boyer
23 hours ago
Reply to  Shawn Harper

The Beaver’s house and Eddie’s house is very similar to the homes over in the Westhampton area.Custom designs,not your brick veneer front and vinyl siding on the side and rear homes you see over in Wyndham.

Michael Boyer
Michael Boyer
23 hours ago
Reply to  Michael Boyer

Sidewalks too

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
5 minutes ago
Reply to  Michael Boyer

Sorta — you didn’t have the vinyl siding and brick veneers back then — even your ugly ranchers had real brick walls. I think a lot of people sneer at all brick veneer and vinyl because they “are fake” — meanwhile, I only sneer if they LOOK fake, or ugly — some masonry veneer and fake masonry homes look a lot nicer than real masonry does in a cheap mid-century rancher. And higher-end vinyl can look nicer than wooden clapboard, and often does, especially after 20 years. I don’t tend to like the split-level look of Beaver’s house or those… Read more »

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 day ago
Reply to  Martha Lee

Thank You.

Sure, there is a matter of taste involved and some would not make this choice but clearly it is a standard choice to choose this for LOCATION reasons — it really shouldn’t need to be explained to adults.

I remember driving around WV with my father and wondering why condos at Snowshoe Mt were so expensive when you could could buy a huge old farmhouse on a bunch of acres nearby for the same price and my father kinda rolled his eyes and said “Rich people like to live with other rich people son.”

Chris Hilbert
Chris Hilbert
1 day ago
Reply to  Landon Edwards

I won’t take up on your offer to call you stupid, but please stop hating on Richmond. City government not getting the job done ? Sure, but we have a lot of positives. I moved to the City of Richmond 30 years ago and it was MUCH worse, I can assure you. Why would anyone buy these homes, you ask ? The marketplace gets to decide these matters. Who thinks they won’t get it ?

Last edited 1 day ago by Chris Hilbert
William Bagby
William Bagby
1 day ago
Reply to  Chris Hilbert

Exactly. I remember how Richmond was back in the 90’s. Pure hell! The city, while far from perfect, is certainly much better off nowadays than it was back then.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 day ago
Reply to  William Bagby

Murder Capital. Businesses leaving for NC.

Landon Edwards
Landon Edwards
1 day ago
Reply to  Chris Hilbert

I was born in Richmond in the ’50s. Unfortunately, I can remember what the city used to be like when things weren’t so screwed up. And no, I don’t miss Tara and the Lost Cause. Agreed that it’s been worse. But it sure as heck has been a lot better.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 day ago
Reply to  Landon Edwards

Well, then you are probably talking about 60s and 70s IN GENERAL and not in Richmond. Maybe if you just defined what it is you want and don’t need people would understand — but there are a lot of VERY savvy people who actually most want a nice condo close to lots of awesomeness. I would live in 400 SQ feet if I were single and lived in some amazing city, since I would only be home to sleep. I lived in 980sf with my wife and we had a huge indoor pool AND a huge outdoor pool. Tennis and… Read more »

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 day ago
Reply to  Chris Hilbert

I agree and thank you for your restraint. We have something in common as I moved to Richmond 20 years ago and not only are there a lot of worse places, but Richmond has gotten a lot better since then unless you are that Scott Burger guy.

And frankly, the whole “The [city… suburbs…. country] is best” is a silly chauvanism …. all three can be great depending — and Richmond metro is still very livable no matter which one you choose!

Justin Reynolds
Justin Reynolds
1 day ago
Reply to  Landon Edwards

Have you looked at the comps in the area? These will sell quickly and if they don’t suit you then don’t bother. That’s how the housing market works. By the same fashion I don’t understand wanting to live in Hanover, Henrico, or Chesterfield where you have to drive everywhere.

Michael Boyer
Michael Boyer
1 day ago

You know what,I just love my diesel gusling F350 Power stroke diesel 4×4 that I drive daily.

Charles Frankenhoff
Charles Frankenhoff
1 day ago
Reply to  Landon Edwards

While I won’t call you stupid, it’s pretty clear you have very little understanding of cities and real estate.

It’s simple math. The fact people are willing to pay should make you question all your analysis and assumptions.

People pay for desirable real estate. Rural real estate comes in vast plots because it’s much less desirable.

Drew Harrison
Drew Harrison
2 days ago

Those are beautiful homes. And they will sell. There is a lot of old money in the area that would like to downsize from 6k+ square feet to 3.5k sq feet and no yard to maintain. VCU Health does attract renowned surgeons and physicians who travel or work a lot. This is who they are targeting. It’s also why they are building 11 and not 250. It’s a small niche in the market.

Sarah Curtis
Sarah Curtis
2 days ago
Reply to  Drew Harrison

Not sure million dollar homes are a small “niche” since the pandemic. Our neighborhood used to be a “starter” one and now we have 7 houses on the street which sold for over a million dollars in the past couple of years.

Sarah Curtis
Sarah Curtis
2 days ago

One of our children recently visited for the first time since Covid. After driving through the Westhampton area (in general), she said the developers should just get it over with and start calling it “Short Pump Lite”.

David Adler
David Adler
2 days ago
Reply to  Sarah Curtis

Not even close IMHO

Martha Lee
Martha Lee
2 days ago
Reply to  Sarah Curtis

Agree with you Dave, not even close.

Charles Frankenhoff
Charles Frankenhoff
1 day ago
Reply to  Sarah Curtis

not at all accurate to say the least. In fact, a ridiculously silly take

I don’t live there, it’s too suburban for me. But I’m there many times a week. It’s very nice high end old garden city suburbia, not the vinyl hell of west Henrico.

sarah curtis
sarah curtis
1 day ago

She was referring to the density…and made the point it’s rapidly losing it’s unique, village like charm. Unless it’s early morning, the traffic is becoming difficult and parking almost impossible to find from mid-day on. These homes may be in a great location but the street is so narrow it’s difficult to navigate if cars or delivery vans are parked on it. Plus, the view isn’t what a lot of people would expect for a million dollars. But they will sell and congratulations to the people living in the small cottages on Granite. They must be sitting on a pile… Read more »

Last edited 1 day ago by sarah curtis
Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
23 hours ago
Reply to  sarah curtis

Well, maybe she is correct in THAT sense.

Short Pump means a lot of different things to different people. Definitely not a place I would want to commute from. Petersburg/colonial Heights would be better on that metric.

And yes, congratulations — I considered being a buyer of one of those little houses in the general area once for that very possibility.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
1 day ago
Reply to  Sarah Curtis

Why exactly?

Dr. Abe Gomez
Dr. Abe Gomez
2 days ago

11 million dollar home sounds pretty steep.

Stephen Weisensale
Stephen Weisensale
1 day ago
Reply to  Dr. Abe Gomez

True, however 11, one million dollar homes does not.

Dr. Abe Gomez
Dr. Abe Gomez
1 day ago

I think we both know the intent of the article; however, the author wrote the title with a dangling modifier which could mislead the audience to believe there will be just 1 home…worth 11 mil

David J. Kupstas
David J. Kupstas
1 day ago
Reply to  Dr. Abe Gomez

The hyphen in million-dollar clarifies it.

Dr. Abe Gomez
Dr. Abe Gomez
1 day ago

touche’ I stand corrected

George MacGuffin
George MacGuffin
2 days ago

“..homes of varying architectural styles.”
And what would these be? “90’s Contemporary”? “Who Said Brick Veneer Facing is Dead”?

At least the Cashel “Modern” homes have some sense of departure in their design, some form of intent or originality, but those first three homes by Richmond Hill? Ryan Homes better check their vault to see if someone ran off with discontinued plans.

Landon Edwards
Landon Edwards
2 days ago

The Cashel Modern designs look like something that would’ve been clustered on N. Anderson Blvd. in Topsail Beach back in the ’90s before Fran came ashore.

Last edited 2 days ago by Landon Edwards
Charles Frankenhoff
Charles Frankenhoff
1 day ago

I’m surprised by how these look. Much more west end henrico than I would expect, not the product that has been flying off the shelves in that location, which is more urban farmhouse.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
23 hours ago

I LIKE urban farmhouse. It looks good and is not expensive to build. Board and Batten for instance looks nice, even when it is fake.

Shawn Harper
Shawn Harper
23 hours ago

Yeah, good point about the those already built ones — I get annoyed by how everyone is an Architecture critic when discussing residences where architecture is not the point, but a vinyl home fronting that it is a brick home is pretty bad, and is one of the hallmarks of McMansions — one of my pet peeves is people who call EVERY big expensive home a McMansion and me having to tell them “No…….. THAT is an Actual mansion. —or— No, that is a well built, very tasteful expensive house that happens to be bigger than average.” The whole idea… Read more »

William Bagby
William Bagby
1 day ago

Even though the city is facing an affordable housing crisis of sorts, this is a desirable neighborhood and I have no doubts that these homes will sell, even at these prices.

sally wannabaker
sally wannabaker
1 day ago

hideous