City approves nonprofit campus transformation, Fulton Hill designation

umfs site map

A site plan for the transformation of the 33-acre UMFS campus.

An initial step in a local nonprofit’s long-term plan to redevelop parts of its Broad Street campus won the blessing of Richmond City Council this week.

Two rezoning requests for United Methodist Family Services passed unanimously at Monday’s council meeting, allowing the organization to begin an eventual transformation of its 33-acre site at 3900 W. Broad St., just west of Scott’s Addition near Interstate 195.

UMFS, which provides foster care, therapy, K-12 schooling and residences for at-risk youth, first announced plans in 2014 to renovate buildings and try to take advantage of West Broad frontage by developing commercial properties that could be leased to outside tenants.

The organization said the plan will play out over 10 to 15 years as it continues fundraising. Upon introducing the idea three years ago, UMFS said the upgrades could cost $20 million to $40 million.

Plans designed by ClarkNexsen, included with the rezoning application, indicate that two commercial parcels totaling 3 acres are proposed on both sides of the campus’ main Broad Street entrance.

The original plans proposed just one 2.5-acre parcel on West Broad Street as a potential commercial development.

UMFS said in its application that it’s working on developing the final vision for the commercial phase. It intends to have a mix of uses, including commercial, office and residential space. The nonprofit has hired local architect Robert Mills.

The plan includes demolishing some buildings, constructing several new buildings, reworked roadways, expanded parking and a relocated main entrance.

A site plan for Studio Row.

A site plan for Studio Row.

The project would consolidate UMFS’ educational and residential services, and upgrade the look of the grounds. The organization has occupied the land for more than 100 years, and some of the buildings were built in the ‘50s.

Also passed by council Monday was an ordinance to designate several properties along Carlisle Avenue and Goddin Street in Richmond’s Fulton Hill neighborhood as revitalization areas.

The properties, at 1000 A-B Carlisle Ave., 910 Goddin St., 1000 Goddin St., 4907 Goddin Court and 1021 Carlisle Ave., are owned by Fulton Hill Properties.

Fulton Hill will develop the bulk of the designated land into two five-story apartment buildings, including a playing field, pool and two parking decks.

Dubbed Studio Row when introduced last year, the project will take shape on 6.4 acres and comprise 204 one- and two-bedroom apartments. The designation also applies to the former Fulton School at 1000 Carlisle Ave., which Fulton Hill renovated in 1999 as Fulton Hill Studios. That site would get an additional 38 apartments.

Fulton Hill Properties said last year the budget for the project would be around $38 million. The revitalization designation will help the development be financed partially by the Virginia Housing Development Authority.

Run by Margaret Freund, the company’s other local projects include Canal Crossing, Lava Lofts and the Lady Byrd Hat building, which is the subject of an ongoing lawsuit related to an alleyway on the canal.

The measure to designate the properties as revitalization areas passed with one abstention from council President Chris Hilbert.

umfs site map

A site plan for the transformation of the 33-acre UMFS campus.

An initial step in a local nonprofit’s long-term plan to redevelop parts of its Broad Street campus won the blessing of Richmond City Council this week.

Two rezoning requests for United Methodist Family Services passed unanimously at Monday’s council meeting, allowing the organization to begin an eventual transformation of its 33-acre site at 3900 W. Broad St., just west of Scott’s Addition near Interstate 195.

UMFS, which provides foster care, therapy, K-12 schooling and residences for at-risk youth, first announced plans in 2014 to renovate buildings and try to take advantage of West Broad frontage by developing commercial properties that could be leased to outside tenants.

The organization said the plan will play out over 10 to 15 years as it continues fundraising. Upon introducing the idea three years ago, UMFS said the upgrades could cost $20 million to $40 million.

Plans designed by ClarkNexsen, included with the rezoning application, indicate that two commercial parcels totaling 3 acres are proposed on both sides of the campus’ main Broad Street entrance.

The original plans proposed just one 2.5-acre parcel on West Broad Street as a potential commercial development.

UMFS said in its application that it’s working on developing the final vision for the commercial phase. It intends to have a mix of uses, including commercial, office and residential space. The nonprofit has hired local architect Robert Mills.

The plan includes demolishing some buildings, constructing several new buildings, reworked roadways, expanded parking and a relocated main entrance.

A site plan for Studio Row.

A site plan for Studio Row.

The project would consolidate UMFS’ educational and residential services, and upgrade the look of the grounds. The organization has occupied the land for more than 100 years, and some of the buildings were built in the ‘50s.

Also passed by council Monday was an ordinance to designate several properties along Carlisle Avenue and Goddin Street in Richmond’s Fulton Hill neighborhood as revitalization areas.

The properties, at 1000 A-B Carlisle Ave., 910 Goddin St., 1000 Goddin St., 4907 Goddin Court and 1021 Carlisle Ave., are owned by Fulton Hill Properties.

Fulton Hill will develop the bulk of the designated land into two five-story apartment buildings, including a playing field, pool and two parking decks.

Dubbed Studio Row when introduced last year, the project will take shape on 6.4 acres and comprise 204 one- and two-bedroom apartments. The designation also applies to the former Fulton School at 1000 Carlisle Ave., which Fulton Hill renovated in 1999 as Fulton Hill Studios. That site would get an additional 38 apartments.

Fulton Hill Properties said last year the budget for the project would be around $38 million. The revitalization designation will help the development be financed partially by the Virginia Housing Development Authority.

Run by Margaret Freund, the company’s other local projects include Canal Crossing, Lava Lofts and the Lady Byrd Hat building, which is the subject of an ongoing lawsuit related to an alleyway on the canal.

The measure to designate the properties as revitalization areas passed with one abstention from council President Chris Hilbert.

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David Humphrey
David Humphrey
5 years ago

I hope they consider more than just commercial on the front side. With the Pulse getting constructed this is a great location for some mixed use structures to feed off the activity going on right across I-195 in Scott’s addition.