12-story apartment building planned for Jackson Ward parking lot

A proposed 254-unit apartment building would replace a parking lot in Jackson Ward. (Rendering courtesy of city documents)

A Philadelphia-based firm is teaming with a Richmond developer to transform a longtime parking lot into one of the taller buildings in Jackson Ward.

Parkway Corp. and locally-based SNP Properties last month filed plans with the city to build a 12-story mixed-use building with over 250 apartments at 200 E. Marshall St.

The development would rise on the roughly 1-acre lot, which Parkway acquired in late 2016 for $2 million and has since been using as paid parking. The plot had previously been owned by the city and was part of the deal that helped lure Stone Brewing to Richmond.

The building would span 315,000 square feet, housing 254 apartments — 190 of which would be 1-bedroom units and the remaining 64 two-bedrooms.

Below the apartments would be 10,000 square feet of commercial space on the ground floor and a 190-space, below-grade parking deck. Amenities listed in the plans include a clubhouse, fitness center and rooftop terrace and pool.

The roughly 1-acre plot that would house the development is currently a surface parking lot. (Mike Platania photo)

Walter Parks Architects is designing the building, Nyfeler Associates is providing land surveying services and HG Design Studio is the project’s engineer.

Calls and emails to Parkway seeking comment went unreturned, and SNP co-founder Eric Phipps declined to comment.

The land’s zoning, B-4 Central Business District, doesn’t have a maximum height restriction, though it does have regulations on how much a building can reach out over abutting streets.

SNP is familiar with building apartments along East Marshall Street, having completed The Penny, a 167-unit project at 2 W. Marshall St., in 2019. Parkway also has a presence elsewhere in Jackson Ward with another acre’s-worth of lots nearby that it bought for $2.3 million in early 2019.

Replacing downtown surface parking lots with dense housing has been a common goal of developers in recent months.

Chicago-based Pinecrest is working on a 15-story apartment tower at 321 W. Grace St. Over on Broad Street near VCU, Minnesota’s Opus Group is doing groundwork for a 12-story apartment tower at 1600 W. Broad St.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
14 Comments
oldest
newest most voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Ashley Smith
Ashley Smith
1 month ago

SNP has done lovely work in the neighborhood thus far. If this new building is anything like the Penny we are in for a treat. Congratulations and thank you for honoring the neighborhood with good work.

John Lindner
John Lindner
1 month ago

Looks attractive and kudos to efforts to fill in the “broken teeth” downtown. Fingers crossed that the parking situation works out. 318 bedrooms and 190 parking spots seems tight, even with changing trends in automobile ownership and the Pulse. I own apartments downtown and 100% of my renters have cars. I think Pinecrest can get away with it because they are a block away from VCU’s massive deck and are clearly targeting students, but this development can’t claim that. For now there are other lots, but if this trend continues, it’s only a matter of time before demand outstrips supply.… Read more »

Roger Turner
Roger Turner
1 month ago
Reply to  John Lindner

I often wonder about the abundance of one bedroom units being built at price points that the majority of students or early twenties people can’t afford (+/-$1500 month plus expenses). It seems like every project I read about now is at least 60% one bedrooms. The developers are not dumb, and I am sure the models they are building are maximizing their ROI. I am not sure there would be many people with children living in apartments typically but if every new project in the City is all one bedrooms it’s going to exaggerate the age old problem of people… Read more »

Carl Schwendeman
Carl Schwendeman
1 month ago
Reply to  Roger Turner

What I notice is there is a ton of $1,500 month apartments being built and a ton of $400,000 homes but I have not seen any job that pays more then $13.00 dollars a hour. And even a $13.00 dollar a hour job is ether part time or very hard to come buy. Full time work is impossible. The most common story I have heard for all the growth is everyone is moving in from New York and buying and renting homes but I kind of wounder how much of a urban legend that is. But what I do no… Read more »

charles Frankenhoff
charles Frankenhoff
1 month ago

given people are renting them, perhaps you are wrong about your generation? You might want to trust the data here…

Matt Faris
Matt Faris
1 month ago

There are plenty of jobs on the business side, and the pay is off the charts. I don’t think the $15/hour pay scale folks are the targets of these units. I sure can’t imagine someone making that to think they can afford this product.

Jerome Bettenfield
Jerome Bettenfield
30 days ago
Reply to  Roger Turner

They build 1 bedrooms precisely because couples with children flee the horrible Richmond schools.

Sean Stilwell
Sean Stilwell
30 days ago

This may come as a surprise to you, but in the areas of the city with the highest rated schools couples with children still choose single family homes.

I’d go out on a limb and say that the apartments in Henrico’s West Broad Village are primarily childless professionals as well.

This is Richmond, not Paris or NYC.

Roger Turner
Roger Turner
30 days ago
Reply to  Sean Stilwell

I see a ton of kids in the apartments near Deep Run High School. Certainly there is a preference for stand alone housing but I think there are people (especially in that area) that want their kids in what they perceive as “good schools” but they can’t afford the housing cost associated with it.

charles Frankenhoff
charles Frankenhoff
1 month ago

I’m excited for more density in the downtown core. Great for the city

Carl Schwendeman
Carl Schwendeman
1 month ago

This really shows how much surface area is going to waste in American Cities and Suburbs devoted to parking lots and one story buildings.

Mark Slater
Mark Slater
1 month ago

What better way to honor an historic African-American neighborhood than to build a high rise full of overpriced one-bedroom apartments for affluent white kids from Northern Virginia.

Ashley Smith
Ashley Smith
1 month ago
Reply to  Mark Slater

Maybe with this increase in supply we can drive out the slumlords like Dobrin aka Carver Homes who rent to child pedophiles in the neighborhood and only screen for financial history of tennants.
Development is complicated but seeing no historic building being torn down to increase rental inventory should be lauded.
Think of all the affluent NOVA young adults who will now have a chance to learn our rich history like that of Maggie Walker’s? This is a net positive.

Carl Schwendeman
Carl Schwendeman
1 month ago
Reply to  Mark Slater

San Fransisco Housing and homelessness nightmare is the result of them locking down upzoning to build new homes and apartments. The way I see this new apartment building is I view it was a people sink that will take pressure off the rents and housing supply for new people moving in. If Richmond wasn’t so liberal on up zoning the rents would be two to three times higher and a lot of people would be forced into the suburbs.