Salomonsky, White eyeing two towers in Scott’s Addition

A rendering shows the two towers proposed at the I-195 off-ramp into Scott's Addition.

A rendering of the towers proposed at the I-195 off-ramp into Scott’s Addition.

A veteran Richmond development team is aiming high – and high-end – for their next project in Scott’s Addition.

Louis Salomonsky and David White of Main Street Realty are proposing two 10-story towers totaling 258 residential units at 1400 Roseneath Road that would convert from apartments to condominiums over time.

The towers – the tallest proposed in Scott’s Addition so far; four stories taller than the nearby 3600 Centre building on West Broad Street – would be built along West Clay Street where the Broad Street exit for Interstate 195 northbound spills into the neighborhood.

The rest of the 2.5-acre property would be filled with a parking deck, surface parking, a community building and swimming pool, and a smaller commercial or office building at the corner of Clay and Roseneath. The property, which takes up about half a block, is directly across Clay from Spy Rock Real Estate’s Preserve at Scott’s Addition apartments.

The $60 million project, called Roseneath Towers, would add 422 parking spaces and homeownership options to the fast-transitioning, rental-heavy neighborhood. Where the Preserve, 3600 Centre and other redeveloped buildings have added hundreds of apartments, the Roseneath Towers apartments would convert to condominiums after about three years, Salomonsky said.

Louis Salomonsky

Louis Salomonsky

In a presentation Wednesday to the Scott’s Addition Boulevard Association, Salomonsky said the market is right for condos in the city, citing demand for more homeownership options in the city’s urban core.

“It’s time for condominiums in the city of Richmond,” he said. “To us, it’s a dangerous commodity – we’ve never done it before, and Richmond is mainly a single-family detached home market. But there is an accelerated demand among the older set, as well as some of the younger people, to own their own apartment.”

With a total building footprint of 94,300 square feet, the towers would include 180 one-bedroom units, 42 one-bedroom units with dens and 36 two-bedroom units, split evenly between the two buildings.

Units would be designed with home office spaces in mind, and rents would range from about $1,200 to $2,000 per month, with a weighted average closer to $2,000, Salomonsky said. When the apartments convert to condos, he said the initial surge of sales would likely be fueled by existing tenants.

White, who described the units as high-end, said those rents would be justified by the height of the buildings, which he said would serve as a billboard for urban living in Scott’s Addition.

“You hear a lot about ‘upscale’ and ‘luxury’ – we have decided to really go all the way with this product,” White said. “It’s really been designed around what we think is the next generation of apartment-condominium occupants.

David White

David White

“One of the things that we think is really important to attract this kind of clientele is the views, and we’re achieving that with the height of the building,” he said. “It’s the way we can get the rents that we’ve got to get to be able to attract the tenants we’re trying to attract. It’s very expensive to build what we’re doing.”

Much of that expense would result from the parking deck, which Salomonsky said would be usable to nearby businesses during the day and restricted to residents overnight.

“That’s an expensive item, but if we’re going to do the condo conversions, it’s vitally necessary for the success of the project,” Salomonsky said. He added that initial plans called for about one-third fewer parking spaces, but the number was increased following feedback from the neighborhood association.

The developers have secured financing through M&T Bank. They purchased the property, formerly the site of an asphalt operation, in 2012 for $550,000 through Asphalt Plant LLC. Salomonsky’s SWA Architects is designing the project.

Salomonsky said the building at the corner of Clay and Roseneath was originally planned for a Dunkin’ Donuts or other food-service retail. He said the building could also be used to house office space.

“We have been enchanted by the fact that the demand for office space is accelerating in the area,” he said. “What that means to us is these high-tech firms that have large payrolls are the 100-percent candidates for a condo conversion.”

The site at 1400 Roseneath Road. Photos by Jonathan Spiers.

The site at 1400 Roseneath Road. Photos by Jonathan Spiers.

The developers have presented the plans to city officials and plan to file a request for a required special-use permit. Salomonsky said approval could come by late May, after which construction would start mid-summer and complete in about a year.

No stranger to the area, Main Street Realty also manages the 1 Scott’s Addition apartments on Summit Avenue and the nearby Todd Lofts apartments on Hermitage Road.

Meanwhile, the other half of the block along West Leigh Street is also slated for redevelopment. Urban Core Development is planning a project for that property, which currently houses three commercial buildings.

Andy Beach of Urban Core said the firm is currently assessing the site and could not release details at this point. Salomonsky said he and White are talking with Urban Core about incorporating its project, which he referred to as offices, into a joint site plan that would integrate parking.

Urban Core is redeveloping the ARC Richmond building on the Boulevard and opening its second Gather co-working space in a building on West Broad Street – the same building that will house the Richmond location for Charlottesville-based Three Notch’d Brewing Co.

Across Leigh Street, Thalhimer Realty Partners is planning a mixed-use development on a 106,000-square-foot property that covers nearly the entire block. And Spy Rock is in the midst of its next Scott’s Addition project: three buildings that will house 190 apartments and commercial space on the site of the former Symbol Mattress Co. facility.

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21 Comments on "Salomonsky, White eyeing two towers in Scott’s Addition"

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Bruce Milam
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It’s terrific to see one of the city’s most forward thinking development teams predicting a near term surge in condo sales and building to that end. SWA and Spyrock are taking dowin the ugliest buildings and replacing them with what will be the most attractive buildings in all of Scott’s Addition. The City moves forward in small and large steps.

Victoria DeRoche
Guest

What an uninspired design. Can’t we do something more progressive that fits into the neighborhood and reflects the history of the space? This has all the charm of NOVA, suburban apartment buildings off of 95. Richmond is better than cookie cutter design.

Sarah Schultz
Guest

I am all for redevelopment of Scott’s Addition, but not when it’s mindless, boring, and reminiscent of Northern Virginia’s uninspired “architecture”. This does not have the character or beauty that Richmond deserves. What kind of “billboard for the city” is this? Seems more like a billboard for Short Pump. Ugh.

Max Walraven
Guest
Agreed Bruce! Build it! The fringes of Scott’s Addition have always been an eyesore. Blocks from there is a homeless shanty town on the rail tracks. Clean it up, add to the tax base, create housing. I read a thing where Fultz architects were bashing the project and how it was was greed driven and looked like A Va beach or NOVA project. What would you rather look at? Defunct buildings with weeds growing out of the asphalt as tall as trees? I know Salomonsky personally and he is an outstanding example of a progressive developer that walks the walk.… Read more »
Chris Fultz
Guest

Bruce- Spyrock= yes, they have a history of thoughtful infill that contributes to the fabric of the neighborhoods they invest in. SWA’s portfolio does not.
Max- I would, and I think most Richmonders, would, rather look at something that is more sensitive in scale and aesthetics…and that expresses the current ethos of RVA. In particular, something that thoughtfully considers the industrial character of Scott’s Addition. I work with many developers around the city and am a big supporter of large scale real estate development…as long as it meets some modest measure of authenticity.

Angi Baber (Pannell)
Guest

Richmond is a special place and not a bland suburb of a large city like DC. We deserve to maintain the character of our city and development should be done with that in mind. There is no good reason that plans can’t be created that would pay homage to the architectural history of Scott’s Addition – other than a complete lack of imagination. I would sincerely hope that anyone with the power to block this does so.

Denis Etonach
Guest
Yeah, good idea, terrible building. You’ve got this great urban, industrial vibe in Scott’s Addition – these big twin towers look they were plopped in from Anywhere, Suburbia in 1978. Or worse, a really nice version of the big public housing complexes from the 60s and 70s. They’re not wearing well now, so I can only imagine how they’ll look in a decade. How about a mix of materials, colors and forms to break up the giant mass of this complex? Love that they’re investing in SA, but please hang out in the neighborhood, check out the history and architecture… Read more »
Brian Walker
Guest

I agree with Max Walraven. Scott’s Addition is a complete eyesore. What Salomonsky has done with the city is outstanding so far. Most everything he is apart of is successful. I’m excited to see this in Scott’s Addition.

Max Walraven
Guest
It seems that everyone is for the development but opposed to the “look” of the building or style of architecture. New, big, clean, and somewhat bland is what sells condos and apartments to the upper-middle eschelon. A few new sprinkled amongst 100+ year old buildings will only compliment the area I think. If it was super modern or industrial we’d be discussing people’s opinions that it was “Too modern or industrial.” Look back at George Ross’ Echo Harbor. It was opposed because it was “Too tall, too wide, too this, too that.” It never got off the ground because of… Read more »
Angi Baber (Pannell)
Guest

Max – If you wouldn’t take your kids the Scott’s Addition then I’m don’t understand why you have strong opinions on what things look like there. But, as an upper middle class person who does spend time there, I think there is an opportunity to have something that is inspired by the area that can still elevate the overall aesthetic. A good architect can find a way to create harmony rather than “sprinkling in” buildings that are in direct contrast to the surrounding environment.

Brian Walker
Guest

I agree, the new design of the buildings aren’t considered boring to everyone. It’s a style for a more progressive, upper-income clientele. That’s what I would be looking for if I were looking for an apartment or condo.
The city is filled with historic architecture. It’s time for some new.

Charles Frankenhoff
Guest

You wouldn’t take your kids to Scott’s addition at night? Thats just silly. Stop watching TV news, or at least keep a map in your hand when you do so.

I’m a member of the “upper middle eschelon” and I’m pretty sure just about every other bizsense reader is. We live in the city because we don’t like short pump. Making the city look like short pump is not a good way to appeal to us.

I’ve got no problem with the size, I think a big project there is great. It just shouldn’t look this awful.

Denis Etonach
Guest

A lot of the commenters seem to have the idea that criticizing the building design is tantamount to saying that Salomonsky and White are bad guys, or that Salomonsky hasn’t done positive things in RVA, or that condos shouldn’t go up at this spot and it should stay a weedy lot.

Kind of a strange leap to argue those points – I haven’t read anything like that from those concerned about the building.

Scott Humphrey
Guest
Don’t just take a quick look at the renderings and blow them off by the rubber stamp trees and typical color scheme. Look at what details you can see. To me the windows are very reminiscent of the factory style windows in the FFV cookie plant building and some of the other factory/warehouse buildings around. I guess what really gets you are first is the balconies, but those are needed to sell new residential. Imagine it without the balconies and it would look more like a large factory. It also depends on the finish materials they use. Will the windows… Read more »
Brian Haneon
Guest

Salomonsky is the guy who went to prison for bribing city councilmen.

How is he still in business in this city?

I would not trust him or people who do business with him.

Faye Hager
Guest

I don’t think this project has anything to do with Salomonsky’s past, but everything to do with his future. Past is past and we need to move forward. He has made Richmond a much better place to live and work. We were not able to go downtown a few years ago and now we have people walking the streets, moving downtown to work and play, and enjoying this beautiful city. I have done business with Salomonsky and I couldn’t find a better, honest person to deal with. His word has always been enough for me.

Stewart Mullins
Guest

Post-Modernism. Ya take something borderline neoclassical looking, and proceed to mute it all out by removing all elements that inspired the texture, detail, and rich contrast that was the reason for it to exist in the first place……Brilliant!! Now all we need is some strident blowhard to browbeat us into submission singing it’s praises (and lining influential pockets) until all cave in to it.

Jason Muir
Guest

Yikes. Don’t Springfield Scott’s Addition…

Melissa Savenko
Guest

I’m all for development. But I don’t see why it also can’t be decent architecture. This is absolute crap. It has no relationship to the surrounding neighborhood, in either scale or design. It looks like someone took a Ballston apartment buildings off a shelf and plopped it down in a cool, post-industrial human-scaled urban neighborhood. Some people may think that’s just fine. I think Richmond deserves better. C’mon guys! Why should we settle for bad design?

Kristy Voraritskul
Guest

Great idea. TERRIBLE DESIGN. Looks like a Marriott Hotel x2! Please rethink and go more MODERN…even a Warehouse/Loft style! We don’t need an EYESORE in such a cool area!!!

Jim Washok
Guest

Scott’s Addition is one of my favorite areas to visit. There’s an increasing number of businesses I commute from Short Pump to patronize. Very exciting rejuvenation. While I do not consider this design horrible, especially considering what is currently at this location, I agree with others that all new construction should incorporate local and historical aesthetics while infusing a taste of freshness. Other renovations have incorporated such a past-to-future connection. Hopefully, this project will be tweaked to better accomplish such.

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